Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (Repeal) Act 2019
#11
Mr. Speaker,

And to say nothing of using up precious time on "tidying up" legislation when I thought, as we were lead to believe, that the oh-so Right Honourable Prime Minister was solely focused on Brexit? As it is the over-stated and over-hyped goal of this Government to crash us out of the European Union at the earliest opportunity, one cannot help buy ask why we must also, while we will be asked to quickly and hurry through debate on the future of our Union we are also told that must hurry and quickly "tidy up" electoral systems that, like it as not, have been a part of our system for some time now.

The fact is, Mr. Speaker, this timing is not suspicious, nor is the intent. My honourable and wise friend, the Member for Barrow & Furness, does more to sum up the true aims of this legislation and this attempt to curtail debate than any obfuscatory comments from the Government. There is something here that is not tidying up, Mr. Speaker, and I call on members of the Government to appeal to the oh-so Right Honourable Prime Minister to reveal his true intent.

Afterall, Mr. Speaker, we are led to believe the Prime Minister is going to spend every waking hour on Brexit plans. Why then does he have time to come in and explain this if it's somehow not included in those plans? Why is this august and deliberative body of honourable men and women going to be shortchanged on their duty to the people of this country if not for some purpose that is far more than "tidying up"?
Ethan Richland MP 
MP for West Bromwich West (2015-) | Labour
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer (2019-)
Media Unknown Constituency Appeal | Campaigning Guru
Reply
#12
Mr. Speaker,

Is there any surprise at all what we are seeing from the Tories new butcher? I use that word intentionally; because these are already the type of stunts we expect to see. Fixed terms on the chop, the way we call elections made mincemeat and forced through this house. He says this is all tidying up. No sir, that's rubbish. The truth is that this Prime Minister fears debate. He will rush through every measure in an attempt to force his will. For weeks we've heard the aches and groans off the party opposite talk about democracy. But now they want to force their way. If the Prime Minister wants an election, perhaps we shall give it to him. But this is not the way, and he should take time to explain to this house his motivations beyond "this does not spark joy"
Labour MP for Tottenham
Media Darling/Backbench Favourite/Finite Resources
Reply
#13
Mr Speaker,

The Prime Minister has come here today to talk about the need to "tidy up" past legislation, he may very well be justified in saying so. If that is the case then why is it that he's decided that it is fit to rush past the scrutiny of this House? The Fixed-term Parliaments Act, is something that I believe is deeply flawed and indeed should at the very least be amended in a significant way, but I also believe that if a government, any government intends to change something as significant as this and tinker with the constitutional arrangement of this country, that it is only right that we as MPs be given the proper time to scrutinise it, to debate it and to consider our decisions carefully.

I am no fan of the Fixed-terms Parliaments Act, I couldn't be clearer about that, but at a time when we're staring down the barrel of a no deal Brexit, when we're confronted with a government who have to scramble now in the final hour to try to prepare for the disaster their fumbling is going to inflict upon our constituents, why is this so urgent? The speed at which the government wishes for this to go ahead makes me and I'm sure it makes other Honourable and Right Honourable Members, deeply uncomfortable, especially in the current context. I would ask the government to simply do this: allow us the proper time to debate this and allow us to scrutinise and come to our own conclusions about, otherwise many who might otherwise feel comfortable with the content of the act, though admittedly some of us will be less impressed with the content of the Prime Minister's contribution today, will not vote for the measures he's put before us today.
Labour MP for Nottingham South (2010-)
Shadow Secretary of State for Social Security, Housing, and Employment (2019-)
Campaigning Guru/Fundraising Extraordinaire/Maverick
Reply
#14
Mr Speaker

Would the Prime Minister like to let the House know when he intends to call his snap general election if this legislation passes, so that we can all just get on with our lives rather than live in collective suspense?
Eleanor Nerina | Labour MP for Brent North (2010 - )
Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Innovation, and Sustainable Growth (2019 - )
Traits: Campaign organiser / Media darling / Finite resources
Reply
#15
Mr Speaker,

I certainly understand the frustrations with the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act. However, this is not just "tidying up" legislation as the Prime Minister so pithily puts it. This is a change to our constitution that he is trying to ram through Parliament to suit his political purposes. Let us remember that in 2015, the Prime Minister, the Leader of the House, every member of this Government, and every Conservative MP were elected on a manifesto that specifically endorsed the Fixed Term Parliaments Act. One hates to use the phrase "u-turn", Mr Speaker: but it appears this government is for turning - turning all over the place. 

This is not just a reversal of the manifesto commitment that this Prime Minister was elected on, Mr Speaker. The Prime Minister refuses to come before this House to be held accountable for his efforts to push this bill through with limited debate. Where is Her Majesty's Government? Where are Her Majesty's Ministers? They hide from Parliament as the try to deliver a wreck-it Brexit that the British people do not want. His own party cannot even stand united behind him.

And, Mr Speaker, we cannot delude ourselves. This bill is about Brexit. The Prime Minister intends to call an election to dissolve Parliament and watch the United Kingdom crash out on March 29 with no plan, no deal, and no win for any person in the United Kingdom. That is an affront to democracy, Mr Speaker. That is an affront to Parliament. That is an affront to every person in this country. And if this bill is not about Brexit, I challenge the Prime Minister to come out and say that. I challenge the Prime Minister to come before this House and be held accountable. Prove to this House that him and his Government are not too scared to be held accountable. Britain cannot afford a terrified Tory who is absolutely afraid of facing the people's Parliament!

We have a responsibility to scrutinise legislation, Mr Speaker. We have a responsibility to propose amendments to improve legislation. We have the responsibility to hold the government of the day to account. None of that is possible if we have a government determined to frustrate the House at every step. Perhaps this is a good bill. Perhaps it could be made better. The House has a right to come to those conclusions without having what is allegedly "tidying up" legislation rushed through. And while we're on the topic of tidying up, I can tell the Prime Minister that, as the mother of three children who went through their teenage years - tidying up is never rushed.
Caroline Blakesley MP DCB
Prime Minister (June 2019-)
MP for Manchester Central (2015-) | Labour
Traits: Fundraising Extraordionare, Campaign Guru, Media Darling, Constituency Pariah
Reply
#16
Mr Speaker,

I'm seeing a lot of sentimentality on the opposing benches for a law that has been on the statute books for less than a decade. Even with the relative youthfulness of this act compared to other constitutional legislation, it seems like it has secured a special place in the hearts of the opposition. But why, Mr Speaker, has the Fixed Term Parliaments Act become such an essential part of our democracy in the eyes of the opposition?

I think the answer is quite simple. The legislation was introduced in 2011 during the Coalition due to the insistence of the Lib Dems, and I think it is fairly obvious why. It was their way of keeping their hands on power, to prevent David Cameron from calling an election and risking them losing their seat at the table. The leader of the Liberal Democrats can claim all he wants that this is a matter of the power of parliament vs the executive, but we all know why he wanted it, and why he voted for it to begin with - for his party's own political self interest. Look how that turned out for them.

But of course, Mr Speaker, there is another reason why those on the benches opposite want to keep the FTPA. We have already seen from a vocal minority of this parliament a total disrespect for democracy, from those who seek to overturn the greatest democratic mandate in our nation's history, and to stop Brexit. The act allows, should this government enter into a scenario in which we lose a vote of no confidence, for a fourteen day period in which an alternative government can be formed. I would not put it past the opposition to use this mechanism to attempt to form a minority government with no mandate whatsoever, to thwart British democracy and replace a democratically elected government with a People's Vote cabal. We cannot allow that to happen. The FTPA doesn't make our country more democratic - it makes it much less so.

Mr Speaker, the opposition also assumes that this is a prelude to an election. That we intend to call an election to secure a new majority in the face of opposition from some on our own benches. This is not the case. I don't want an election, the Cabinet doesn't want an election and the Prime Minister has made it clear, he does not want an election. But, should the situation change, the government must have the power to end the gridlock. If the worst comes, we cannot have a government held hostage by a zombie parliament trying to hoard power for itself.
Julia Goldman
Shadow Secretary of State for Scoltand
Shadow Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Growth
Shadow Minister for Women and Equalities
Member of Parliament for Dumfries and Galloway (2019 - present)
Scottish Conservative and Unionist

Media Darling/Campaigning Guru/Socially Unaware
Reply
#17
Ah, at long last, Mr Speaker, a Minister of Her Majesty's Government graces the House with his presence and admits what it is all about: Brexit. At least he, contrary to his friend the Prime Minister, has the decency to admit it. Unfortunately, his logic is rather lacking. After all, unless he knows of more rebels than I know of, it would be very hard to form such a kind of disparate minority government, and no motion of no confidence has passed the House or even be presented. If this is what the Prime Minister is thinking, Mr Speaker, I could sum it up in one word: paranoia.

Mr Speaker, I tire of constantly making this argument, but has it even occurred to the benches opposite that those who voted Remain are part of the people as well? That those who voted Leave but do not want their wreck-it Brexit are part of the people as well? They act as if the people are of one voice and one will, and it is conveniently the Conservative Party's way or the highway.

But even seen apart from that obviously credulous argument about the basis of its right to conduct the business it is now conducting, it is even more pathetic to argue that just because in this one instance it could, be a very far-fetched argument, be able to work against "democracy", the government is allowed to do away with anything that it pleases. General Public Acts of Parliament are not made to stand or fall by one instance - they are meant to govern the goings-on of this nation for a longer period of time, not to be abolished at the first convenience. Even moreso with an Act, that, even if it had only been put on the statute books last year, is part of Britain's written constitutional framework, like it or not.

The government is playing with fire by its cavalier attitude to the law of the land. If only the government's convenience is enough argument to repeal an Act of Parliament, especially one that governs the government and Parliament itself, where will it end?

I am grateful to the member for Sutton and Cheam to finally being honest. But I am afraid it gives me all the reason to condemn the government for its total contempt of this House and the laws that govern it. If the government thinks to think of Parliament and its laws as a mere impediment to dispose of as it pleases, I call upon all members of this House to tell them that is, to put it mildly, not on.
the Rt Hon. Emily Greenwood MP

Deputy Leader of the Labour Party (2019-)

MP for Barrow & Furness (2010-)
Secretary of State for Education (2019-)
Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Commons (2019-)

Shadow SoS for Public Services (2019)


Traits: Media Darling, Campaigning Guru, Constituency Appeal, Finite Resources
Reply
#18
Mr. Speaker,

I would like to read back a comment made by the gentleman Member for Sutton and Cheam. "Should the situation change, the government must have the power to end the gridlock." As my honourable and wise colleague, the Member for Barrow and Furness points out, this could not be a more transparent reveal of why the Government not only wants to deal with this "tidying up" now but to also ensure that we do this "tidying up" as quick and non-transparently as possible- in that they really do sseek to have a legal mechanism to go around Parliament in the hopes of saving their precious no-deal Brexit.

If that is not the case, then the Government should seek to slow its roll and allow for a real debate on the merits both of the Fixed Term Parliaments Act and the provisions of this replacement that address those concerns. But we can't even hear that because of the laser-focus on ensuring each and everything has to be done now because it's in the best interests of one individual rather than the nation.
Ethan Richland MP 
MP for West Bromwich West (2015-) | Labour
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer (2019-)
Media Unknown Constituency Appeal | Campaigning Guru
Reply
#19
Mr Speaker,

There we have it.

An admission from the government that this is not an act of "tidying up", of the apolitical removal of clearly flawed legislation, which was the Prime Minister's contention, the Prime Minister's justification for the expedited timetable. Instead, the member from Sutton and Cheam has admitted that the purpose of this legislation is substantive: to secure an easier passage for a disastrous undemocratic no-deal Brexit. 

Let us put aside the debates over the merits of FTPA - the government's justification for guillotining debate on this bill has now been exposed as untrue. That threatens a norm, of parliamentary sovereignty, of effective scrutiny over constitutional changes, that is far more important than anything we can say for or against FTPA.
Grant Smith
Liberal Democrat MP for Leeds North West (2005-present)

Media Unknown, Constituency Appeal, Campaign Organiser, Fundraiser Extraordinaire 
Previously: Sir Lachlan Domnhall Coinneach Duncan MacMahon; Graham Adiputera; I think I played some dull Labour bloke at one point
Reply
#20
Mr Speaker,

I cannot see myself in any circumstance backing this bill, but there is one matter this House should address: that the power to advise the Queen to dissolve Parliament this bill would give back to the Prime Minister unfettered is not used to force us into a no-deal without parliamentary scrutiny.

I therefore beg to move the amendment in my name:

Quote:Add new sections 5.4 and 5.5 to read:
"5.4. Prior to the dissolution of Parliamet and the issuing of writs for a new general election, the Prime Minister shall write a letter to the European Commission to request an extension of the deadline for exiting the European Union until at least a month after the date for which the new Parliament is to be summoned.
5.5. Section 5.4 shall lapse in the event of the ratification by Act of Parliament of the European Union withdrawal agreement.
the Rt Hon. Emily Greenwood MP

Deputy Leader of the Labour Party (2019-)

MP for Barrow & Furness (2010-)
Secretary of State for Education (2019-)
Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Commons (2019-)

Shadow SoS for Public Services (2019)


Traits: Media Darling, Campaigning Guru, Constituency Appeal, Finite Resources
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)