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Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (Repeal) Act 2019
#1
Mr. Speaker, 

I submit the following legislation to the House for first reading, and beg that it be read a second time, concurrent with the restrictions and stipulations outlined in M-3, "FTPA Repeal Timetable Motion."
William Grey MP - Conservative Party 

MP for Romford (2015 - )

Backbench Favorite, Campaigning Guru, Socially Unaware 
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#2
ORDER!

Second Reading!
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#3
Mr Speaker,

This blatant move to obfuscate Parliament is outrageous. This Government has absolutely no mandate to repeal the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, something he voted for during the last Parliament and now decries on twitter as a mistake. The Prime Minister in this move is showing that he has absolutely no respect for Parliament and its role in scrutinising legislation, he is here in an attempt to embolden his own position through any possible means and I call on all sensible members of this House to reject this blatant power play from a Prime Minister drunk on his own newly acquired power.

Let me tell him this, he may sit on those benches for the time being but he has shown his contempt for our democracy and democratic processes. Parliament must have its say on the legislation the Government brings forward, any attempt by the Prime Minister to jeopardise the position and authority of this Parliament must be resisted. I urge all members to vote down this ridiculous ploy.
Elizabeth Tanner MP
Bristol East
Labour Party

Traits: Backbench Favourite, Campaigning Guru, Socially Unaware


Formerly Martin Pelham MP (Con, Bracknell); Edith Granger MP (ONP, South Cambridgeshire)
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#4
Mr. Speaker,

Given that the Government wants to limit the discussion of this to a mere day, I really hope they have plans beyond plopping this legislation down and hoping the size of their majority makes all things sufficient from there. I further hope there is a legitimate explanation for why there is an effort to stifle Parliamentary review of this important legislation and why this must be done oh-so urgently.

I'm surprised, Mr. Speaker, that the Government deigned to even let us know. I feel like they would have skipped that if at all possible as well.
Ethan Richland MP 
MP for West Bromwich West (2015-) | Labour
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer (2019-)
Media Unknown Constituency Appeal | Campaigning Guru
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#5
Mr Speaker,

When it comes to matters of constitutional importance, and there can be no doubt that electoral law rises to such standards, it is critical that those matters are debated fully. The fact that we are considering the repeal of an 8 year old law is testament to that.

It would be especially helpful if a Minister would deign to grace the House with their presence, to explain why the legislation is necessary.

My Rt Hon Friend, the Prime Minister, would be wise to be more cautious. Another Place looks down on legislation that has preceded through this place too rapidly, especially where there is no popular mandate for it.
Pooja Sharma | Conservative Party
MP for Hertsmere (2010-present)


Backbench Favourite, Campaign Organiser, Uninspiring

Formerly: Robert Lascelles, One Nation Party
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#6
Mr. Speaker,

I am happy to answer my Hon. friend's concerns myself. As I have told him privately, I am always available when he wants to discuss the direction this Government is heading in and our legislative agenda. I would never think to delegate that sort of task to a Minister; I am here, at his pleasure, to explain our collective position.

The intent behind this legislation is quite simple. The Fixed-term Parliaments Act of 2011 failed in its stated intention, and the Government is acting to rectify that failure by repealing the legislation and reinstating the previous method by which elections were called. There are fundamental loopholes in the legislation that allow for its intent to be superseded, effectively nullifying the original point of providing for more regular, 5 year Parliamentary sessions. Through a motion presented to Parliament, or if a Prime Minister chose to vote in favor of a VoNC against their own Government, the Governing party can easily circumvent the mechanisms of the legislation to order a general election.

It is simply an ineffectual, unnecessary piece of legislation that never represented a true constitutional change to our legal system. If anything, repealing the FTPA is more of a tidying up measure than any great reform. We are simply acknowledging the failures of the legislation, and acting to revert back to the previous system under which elections operated. It allows the Government of the day more flexibility to call an election at a time they deem appropriate, while ensuring the people retain the right to punish a Government that misuses this power by voting them out of office.

To be completely honest with my Hon Friend the Member for Bognor Regis and Littlehampton, and in fact to the whole of the House, I am surprised to see this simple repeal cause so much controversy. I think Parliament, like any legislature, must possess the power to be nimble and prepared to meet the challenges of the times. We must have the ability to go to the people to seek a mandate for our agenda whenever necessary. This legislation achieves both of those things, by reverting back to a system that has served our Parliamentary democracy for decades. I hope that answers my honorable friend's question, and I stand at the ready to explain further if needed.
William Grey MP - Conservative Party 

MP for Romford (2015 - )

Backbench Favorite, Campaigning Guru, Socially Unaware 
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#7
Mr. Speaker,

I thank the oh-so Right Honourable Prime Minister inasmuch as he deserves it for explaining the rationale for this legislation. I do hope he chooses to cease obfuscation and explain the rationale as to why the Government is seeking to drastically reduce debate and consideration of this legislation to the point of eliminating it.
Ethan Richland MP 
MP for West Bromwich West (2015-) | Labour
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer (2019-)
Media Unknown Constituency Appeal | Campaigning Guru
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#8
Mr. Speaker,

The Government believes this to be a very straightforward matter, a "tidying up," measure as I previously said. With that in mind we do not believe it necessary that the legislation enjoy the usual period for debate, but instead a condensed version that will allow all necessary questions to be answered and any pertinent amendments to be made. The time restraints have clearly not had a negative impact on the Member for West Bromwich West, as he has found a way to make here to the House and speak on the legislation.
William Grey MP - Conservative Party 

MP for Romford (2015 - )

Backbench Favorite, Campaigning Guru, Socially Unaware 
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#9
Mr Speaker,

The Prime Minister says this is "tidying up" legislation, that it is a straightforward matter, that there can be no lengthy or drawn out debate possible on what, to him, is clearly a very cut and dry subject. But that rationale may have worked in theory, but it has collapsed when confronted with reality. Mr Speaker - many of the opposition parties are united in opposing the guillotining of debate. Members of his own party have expressed doubts and concerns. Mr Speaker, the contention that this does not require a full debate has, I think, been thoroughly debunked by the reaction to his proposal. And I call on him, in good faith, in recognition of how the FTPA enjoyed cross-party support in its inception, to withdraw his proposal to shorten the timetable and allow a full debate. 

Because Mr Speaker, we're not actually debating the merits of the bill in its full and necessary detail. We have been forced instead to use this time to scrutinise and debate what seems to me to be an abuse of the timetabling powers that the government enjoys. Mr Speaker, I actually do believe that the FTPA, while imperfect, represented a move against a system that, before, placed too much power in the hands of the executive, that returning to it would be unideal, improper. The matter is fundamentally a substantive matter. It is not a matter of just "tidying" things up. It is a controversial decision - one that he has no mandate in his manifesto to implement - and it should be treated as such. 

And Mr Speaker, I am worried about the precedent that this will set for how this administration might choose to treat parliament in the future - as I'm sure many of my colleagues, including fine Burkean conservatives on the bench opposite, are as well. What we have here is the government cutting down, arbitrarily, the opportunities for debate and scrutiny on major decisions. We have what appears to be a Prime Minister, with no mandate from the British people, taking as one of his first acts in office the unilateral decision to ram through a major constitutional change of which he will be the main beneficiary of. 

That's not right. Mr Speaker, I urge the government to listen to what has been said, to recognise how they are presenting themselves, and to swiftly change course.
Grant Smith
Liberal Democrat MP for Leeds North West (2005-present)

Media Unknown, Constituency Appeal, Campaign Organiser, Fundraiser Extraordinaire 
Previously: Sir Lachlan Domnhall Coinneach Duncan MacMahon; Graham Adiputera; I think I played some dull Labour bloke at one point
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#10
Mr Speaker,

Tidying up, the Prime Minister says. Tidying up, I tell you! As if this bill were a clutter to the statute books, rather than the democratic safeguard it is against a Prime Minister using his power to call a general election to stymy Parliament. He has made this out to be the will of the people. In a time when trust in politics is at an all-time low, the last the people want to see is political games and point-scoring, and a Prime Minister, I'm sorry to say, who is only out there for himself.

Mr Speaker, he hasn't even got a very clear grasp of the meaning of parliamentary procedure. Due to the time constraints, we would not be able to scrutinise effectively that repeal of an act of Parliament that, whether the Prime Minister wants it or not, has come to form part of the constitutional fabric of this country. The way in which elections work in this country should not be decided on a cold afternoon in March, but should at very least have full scrutiny and the possibility to discuss the impact of excising this bill from that constitutional order again. And at the very least, Mr Speaker, this Prime Minister should have the common decency to stand up and tell Parliament why he feels it shouldn't have the check on his power to advise its dissolution and try for another.

I warn the Prime Minister, Mr Speaker. Because by omitting to offer any explanation except "tidying up" and his short but altogether not sweet remarks in opening this debate, he is leaving all impression on me, and on many people who will be watching this House, that all he is interested in tidying up is his path to achieving his unaccountable and unendorsed goals. I suspect he is trying to tidy up his way to return to 10 Downing Street, as he sees it. You might say, Mr Speaker, that he is tidying up "my way or the highway." In leaving that impression, he is mortgaging the trust the British people have placed in us as politicians not to play political games but to govern in the interests and by the will of all of them, rather than just a small minority. If he wants an election, he can say so - and we'll debate one and quite possibly grant him his wish.

But since he is new to his office, let me give the Prime Minister another chance to dispel that impression. Will he give this House a real, substantive argument why a part of the British Constitution should be put on the scrapheap within the day by this House?
the Rt Hon. Emily Greenwood MP

Deputy Leader of the Labour Party (2019-)

MP for Barrow & Furness (2010-)
Secretary of State for Education (2019-)
Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Commons (2019-)

Shadow SoS for Public Services (2019)


Traits: Media Darling, Campaigning Guru, Constituency Appeal, Finite Resources
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