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PC14 - New Government
#1
"With a new government being formed and the new coalition agreement being public, what do you think lies in store for Britain?"

Ends 11th May 2020 23:59
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#2
A betrayal of Brexit---pure and simple. I assure the people of my constituency and the majority of voters throughout the United Kingdom who voted to leave in the 2016 Referendum that I won't stand for it and will fight with every fibre of my being to ensure that the will of the British people is respected. 

Zombie Government 2.0 incorporates a coalition agreement aimed at one thing--maintaining power at any costs. This is all this agreement is good for. It is not good for the people of my constituency--and it's certainly not a good deal for the whole of the United Kingdom. Conservatives will fight hard in opposition to ensure that the will of the people is respected and fought for, every step of the way.
Daniel Brown
Conservative MP for Bosworth
Shadow Home Secretary
Traits: Constituency Appeal (+)/Media Darling (+)/Campaigning Guru (+)/Finite Resources (-)
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#3
I am deeply concerned about the question of Brexit as it seems that the priority of the Government is going to be to avoid or elude it. The attempt to have a new referendum -- which is quite preposterous in itself -- without giving the voters any option other than a specific version of Brexit as conceived by the Government or no Brexit at all, is at odds with the will of the British people. And I see it as my responsibility as the Conservative Shadow Brexit Secretary to do all in my capacity to make sure there is going to be a Brexit worthy of the name.

I am also puzzled that the Government seeks to abolish English votes for English laws and I see it as an opportunistic power grab that silences a significant portion of voters. Moreover, I see the Coalition programme insufficient regarding the issues of security and immigration as global terrorism has not ceased to be a major threat for the United Kingdom which, as I believe, is not taken into account adequately.

I am, however, looking forward to cooperate with the Coalition government where possible and desirable for the greater good of the United Kingdom.
John Lamarr MP
Member of Parliament for Christchurch
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport & Infrastructure
(media darling / campaigning guru / maverick)
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#4
I must admit I was perplexed to see in the Coalition Agreement a policy proposal which stated the need to reduce the day-to-day deficit, it's a noble cause for sure but the reason it surprised me was that thanks to the last Conservative Government we already a day-to-day surplus so there is no deficit left to eliminate here. For all of Labour's talk about how badly run the economy has been for the last nine years they can't step away from our priority of deficit reduction and they can't help themselves for trying to steal our achievements and paint them red. Now is the time for investment in our economy and public services, but that investment today is only possible because yesterday the Conservative Party were willing to make the difficult decisions where Labour simply weren't.

Let's get one thing perfectly clear, every public vote since 2015 has resulted in a majority for parties offering the people the chance for Brexit. In 2015 the people voted by a majority for the Conservative Party and UKIP, the only two major parties promising a referendum in the first place, in both 2019 elections there was a clear majority for the Conservatives, Brexit Party, and Labour who are (at least officially) a pro-Brexit party, and then of course let us not forget the 2016 referendum in the first place which produced the mandate to leave despite overwhelming opposition from many sections of the televisual media and the state. To suggest that a vote against whatever deal Labour proposes is a vote against Brexit in the light of these four distinct and independent mandates to leave the EU is farcical, nothing more than a desperate attempt to keep the Liberal Democrats on side and keep this Government in office. A vote against this Government's Brexit deal is not a vote against Brexit, it is a vote against this Government's Brexit deal, and should be followed by the appropriate steps to secure a better one.

This is a Government with a tenuous majority, relying on a coalition and confidence deals with four other parties, why am I not surprised that they would seek to unpick the solution to one of the most difficult constitutional questions in a generation by repealing English Votes for English Laws? This is a party that is only in power because of their result in Scotland, without that result they would be a solid 20-30 seats behind the Conservative Party so it only makes sense that they would act in their interests rather than England's interests. This is a Government that will do or say anything to get and hold power: they would cancel Brexit to win and keep the support of the Liberal Democrats, they would u-turn on their Wales policies to win the support of Plaid Cymru, and they would abolish important constitutional reforms to be carried through by their Scottish MPs (and where necessary the SNP) on issues that only affect England.
The Hon Dylan Macmillan MP
North East Bedfordshire 2015 - Present

Chancellor of the Exchequer: 2020 - Present

Chair of the Justice Select Committee: 2019 - 2020
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#5
Labour will no doubt tell you that the formation of this Government has resulted in a strong and stable Government. Yet again we see the Government, not only being formed by a coalition, but having to be propped up by numerous smaller parties. The issue now is that the Coalition document does not offer a majority Government. To get legislation passed, the Government are relying on Irish Labour, Fianna Fail, Plaid, The SNP and the Green Party voting for every policy put forward - this will only give a very slim majority. The Government will again either need to water down their proposals from what they would do if in Government alone, or they will need to consult with numerous parties on every legislation in order to know whether it will pass. The really serious confidence legislation like the Budget, and the confidence motion we are currently voting on may pass - but outside of the Coalition the majority of policies will need to be agreed on a case-by-case basis. A small-scale internal Labour "rebellion", one party out of the aforementioned disagreeing with a proposal would stop the Government passing legislation. This is a dead parliament, it has ceased to be able to carry out its functions. This is not a long-term Government and it cannot continue like this for much longer.
MP for Hexham 2005 -
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#6
The fact that Defence Chiefs have felt the need to brief the media about "shameless pork barrel politics" is unprecedented. Never before has a government so egregiously abused defence procurement to make a nakedly partisan point and an electoral statement based not on the defence of our nation but on the defence of Labour's position in Number 10. There are a few things that should be above politics: our national defence has got to be one of them so that our soldiers on the front line can have confidence that they are not party political pawns moving round a chessboard for the amusement of the Defence Secretary. I call on Mr Quinn to apologise immediately.
The Hon Dylan Macmillan MP
North East Bedfordshire 2015 - Present

Chancellor of the Exchequer: 2020 - Present

Chair of the Justice Select Committee: 2019 - 2020
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#7
Regardless of what policies we can hope for, it looks like we can expect plenty of brazen partisanship going forward.  I can't tell whether the Defense Secretary was discussing military procurements or austerity, but as far as I can tell this Government can't pass up the opportunity for a cheap, misguided political shot on something as mundane as a statement about buying a bunch of AFVs.
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#8
Despite the short tenure of the previous government, we in the Liberal Democrats still secured many substantive victories and crucial commitments as part of our mission to secure rights, opportunities and freedoms for every individual. We made sure the budget took action on moral injustices in our country such as homelessness and a lack of support for those with disabilities or mental health conditions; achieved our manifesto commitments to a fiscally responsible budget that expanded investment across the country; and placed the UK as a firm leader on tackling international crises and championing the green economy. We took proactive steps in dismantling the hostile environment, implemented a moratorium on new net runway construction, started the second stage of the Leveson inquiry, introduced humanist marriages, and laid the groundwork for far greater access to culture and sport. Liberal Democrats made a difference in the last government. It is with this record of accomplishment that we reenter government, and it is this record of accomplishment that we will build upon. 

---

The result of the election makes one thing clear - the question of Brexit will be put back to the people. No longer will politicians be allowed to interpret Brexit as an excuse, as a blank slate, for whatever wild political reforms or fringe economic crusades that they want. No longer will there be the democratic outrage of the actual concrete form of Brexit, no matter how unpopular or undesirable its trade-offs and losses are, being forced upon the people of this country without a specific positive democratic mandate. The Liberal Democrats were proud to lead the campaign for the People's Vote, and we will be proud to lead the Remain campaign when the Vote takes place. 
Grant Smith
Liberal Democrat MP for Leeds North West (2005-present)

Media Unknown, Constituency Appeal, Campaign Organiser, Fundraiser Extraordinaire 
Previously: Sir Lachlan Domnhall Coinneach Duncan MacMahon; Graham Adiputera; I think I played some dull Labour bloke at one point
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#9
The Liberal Democrats can call this a coup for remain but let's be real here, Brexit has won the last four votes on the matter. In 2015, when the Liberal Democrats were reduced to eight seats by the population, there was a clear majority for the Conservative Party and the Brexit Party, in 2016 we had the largest democratic exercise in the history of the United Kingdom and people voted to leave, and now in 2019 we have had two elections where the combined vote of Brexit supporting parties didn't just beat the Remain Alliance, it crushed them. There is absolutely no mandate to remain, there is no appetite in the country for the votes of 17mn people to be simply tossed in the bin because Mr Smith thinks they got it wrong, the people demand that Brexit is sorted once and for all. The people voted to leave the European Union, voting against Labour's deal is not rejecting Brexit it is rejecting this Government and their deal.
The Hon Dylan Macmillan MP
North East Bedfordshire 2015 - Present

Chancellor of the Exchequer: 2020 - Present

Chair of the Justice Select Committee: 2019 - 2020
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#10
There's an inherent untruthfulness in trying to twist 2015 and the two 2019 general elections as mandates for Brexit. 2015 gave a mandate for the initial referendum. The two 2019 elections, in contrast, resulted in clear majorities for parties backing a People's Vote. Politicians cherry-picking the results of elections, like Dylan Macmillan is trying to do, to find the outcome that they like is exactly why we need a People's Vote - the issue is now so confused, the stakes so high, that we need to stop politicians gazing into the crystal ball and trying to decipher what option they think best represents the will of the people, and go back to the people and ask them. A People's Vote will ensure everyone has a say, that no voter is ignored or shut out of the process.
Grant Smith
Liberal Democrat MP for Leeds North West (2005-present)

Media Unknown, Constituency Appeal, Campaign Organiser, Fundraiser Extraordinaire 
Previously: Sir Lachlan Domnhall Coinneach Duncan MacMahon; Graham Adiputera; I think I played some dull Labour bloke at one point
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