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Business, Infrastructure and Energy Secretary

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Business, Infrastructure and Energy Secretary
#1
Questions to the Department of Business, Infrastructure & Energy
"We all know that Mary has a nice cat" - Fairbanks
"Nice pussy" - Coombes
"Nice pussy" - Max
"Oh look, it's Mary's massive pussy" - Keynes
"Aw. Mary touching her pussy" - Fairbanks

"Mary loves pussy" - Ed

Keynes: "@Mad_Mary do you want normies off your stream?"
Me: "NORMIES GET OFF MY STREAM REEEEEEEEEEEEEE"
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#2
Mr. Speaker,

I would like to congratulate the Right Honourable Gentleman on his appointment, I would also like to say I watched with interest as he so masterfully appealed to populist elements of his own party and almost became Prime Minister as a result. Close but no cigar, Mr. Speaker. I hope he uses these talents effectively in the national interest in future.

Mr. Speaker, in the Equalities Act 2010 my Right Honourable friend for Peckham set up provisions to ensure large companies with over two-hundred and fifty employees released their pay data so that we could effectively scrutinise employers who continued to throw fuel into the fire of the pay gap which is not only unjust but hurts our economy. Unfortunately, the coalition did very little to enact these provisions because of the protestations of some of the Right Honourable Gentleman's colleagues. It is one of the many shameful legacies of the coalition government of past.

However, Mr. Speaker, the Conservative Party have given us reason to be hopeful. They promised to the British electorate they would act and ensure these companies release their pay data to deliver justice for women. Cameron continued to repeat this promise after his election victory. It is a small step that can deliver great justice for Britain. Will the Right Honourable Gentleman reaffirm this promise to the House?
Diana Edwards.
Founder & Leader of the Social Union Party.
MP for Crosby (1997-2010) & Sefton Central (2010-).
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (2005-2006).
SOS for Work and Pensions (2006-2009) & Business, Innovation and Skills (2009-2010).
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#3
Mr. Speaker,

I thank my Rt. Hon. friend - who once held a similar portfolio to mine - for her welcome, acerbic though it may have been. I would like to agree with my Rt. Hon. friend in saying that I intend to support this nation's business, infrastructure, and energy capabilities and propel us forwards. I think it should be clear by now that Government doesn't really create jobs: that is what business, infrastructure, and energy sectors are committed to doing.

I believe the Rt. Hon. MP from Sefton Central is referring to Section 78 of the Equality Act 2010, which allows Government to establish regulations for certain businesses to disclose gender pay gaps. I do understand that enforcement of this regulation was a manifesto pledge, and I can assure this House that I will be looking into how to ensure such a regulation can be met with the lowest cost to society as possible.
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#4
Mr. Speaker,

Of course, Section 78 of the Equality Act by no means obliged the government to establish regulations that will compel businesses to release their pay data. But that does not detract from the fact that this is a simple action that should be taken and that the Conservatives had promised to take.

I know the Right Honourable Gentleman has a conveniently selective memory when it comes to the manifesto that he campaigned on, one only need to see him pretend the former Prime Minister didn't make clear there would be no referendum on the European issue, but I will quote the Conservative manifesto to him, word for word:

"The gender pay gap is the lowest on record, but we want to reduce it further and will push business to do so: we will require companies with more than 250 employees to publish the difference between their average pay for male and female employees."

This was the promise the Conservatives made to the British people. So I ask him, yes or no answer acceptable only, will he uphold that promise?
Diana Edwards.
Founder & Leader of the Social Union Party.
MP for Crosby (1997-2010) & Sefton Central (2010-).
Chief Secretary to the Treasury (2005-2006).
SOS for Work and Pensions (2006-2009) & Business, Innovation and Skills (2009-2010).
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#5
Mr. Speaker,

I believe I was clear enough in my previous answer, but for the sake of my Rt. Hon. colleague from the party opposite: I intend to maintain the campaign pledge - and, at the risk of repeating myself - I am looking into the least obtrusive way to implement it. If she would like to discuss this issue further, she certainly knows where my office is, and I am proud to maintain an open-office policy for my parliamentary colleagues.
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#6
Mr Speaker.

Why is the Government trying to destroy the right to strike?
Lucas Hamilton
Labour MP for West Ham 2010-Onwards
Deputy Leader of the Labour Party: 2015-Onwards

Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer: 2015-Onwards
Mayor of London: 2000-2008
______
'Emergencies' have always been the pretext on which the safeguards of individual liberty have been eroded. - Friedrich Hayek
Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. - Milton Friedman
Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Milton Friedman
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#7
Mr. Speaker,

The Hon. member for West Ham could not be further from the truth in his assertion that I am trying to "destroy the right to strike." In fact, I am trying to save the right to strike through the provisions of the Trade Union Act 2015, which I have just introduced to this House.

Trade unions are an irreplaceable part of our nation's fabric - something I'm certain we can agree upon. They have advocated for the rights of workers, and continue to do so. What is intolerable, however, is the amount of power that they exercise capriciously against the common people of the United Kingdom. We cannot allow one sector of society to dominate the others, and as the current union laws stand, they can hold the people hostage in more ways than one.

What this Government's Trade Union Act 2015 will do is simple, and will protect and preserve the right to strike. First, it will require that a majority, gained under a lawful quorum, is attained prior to striking. For essential services, such as health, transport, police, and fire, among others, the threshold will be higher, reflecting the importance of these industries to our nation's economy. It will also prevent old ballots from being used to call a new strike.

This is a commonsense proposal - unlike the Hon. gentleman's suggestions to the Trade Union Congress following his election. As I've said elsewhere, this is Pro-Britain, pro-worker, and pro-business. I am honoured to be at the helm of such an important and mutually beneficial bill.
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#8
Mr Speaker.

Ignoring the Right Honourable Member's obvious attempts at deflection and acknowledging that the debate about the Trade Union Bill will be forthcoming, does the Secretary of State believe that 50% is the requirement for a legitimate mandate in a democratic exercise?
Lucas Hamilton
Labour MP for West Ham 2010-Onwards
Deputy Leader of the Labour Party: 2015-Onwards

Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer: 2015-Onwards
Mayor of London: 2000-2008
______
'Emergencies' have always been the pretext on which the safeguards of individual liberty have been eroded. - Friedrich Hayek
Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. - Milton Friedman
Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Milton Friedman
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#9
Mr. Speaker,

I do firmly believe that, in a referendum that will be binding on all voters (and even on non-voters), yes, 50%+1 is required for a legitimate democratic mandate. Would we have allowed Scotland to exit the United Kingdom if a minority of those voting were in favor, but a majority wasn't?

Naturally, and where the Hon. gentleman was going with this question is whether or not this Government has a democratic mandate, to which I can emphatically reply in the affirmative. After governing in a coalition, the British people decided that the Conservative Party - this Party - is best suited to lead the nation forward. They signaled that by giving this Government an absolute majority of seats in this House to execute the popular will, as laid out in our manifesto.
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#10
So Mr Speaker.

If the Government believes they have a firm mandate to govern having received the popular support of less than 30% of the country's voting population, why do they believe that such a blatant double standard should be levied against our public sector workers who would require 50% +1 of their eligible voting population to vote for them?
Lucas Hamilton
Labour MP for West Ham 2010-Onwards
Deputy Leader of the Labour Party: 2015-Onwards

Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer: 2015-Onwards
Mayor of London: 2000-2008
______
'Emergencies' have always been the pretext on which the safeguards of individual liberty have been eroded. - Friedrich Hayek
Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. - Milton Friedman
Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Milton Friedman
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#11
Mr. Speaker,

As I made it clear in my reply to my Hon. colleague's previous question, this government does indeed have a strong mandate to govern. Over 50% of this House hails from the Conservative Party, which is an impressive increase upon the 2010 election results and is further impressive considering the presence of a number of elected parties, especially in Scotland.

The British people cannot rightly be forced to participate in our legislative elections; such a proposal would be a slight against their liberties. Union members, however, can and should be able to exercise their rights to vote as they please, and as we are seeing with the ongoing strike action, such actions should not be taken lightly.
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#12
(11-13-2017, 09:21 PM)Orville Stark Wrote: Mr. Speaker,

As I made it clear in my reply to my Hon. colleague's previous question, this government does indeed have a strong mandate to govern. Over 50% of this House hails from the Conservative Party, which is an impressive increase upon the 2010 election results and is further impressive considering the presence of a number of elected parties, especially in Scotland.

The British people cannot rightly be forced to participate in our legislative elections; such a proposal would be a slight against their liberties. Union members, however, can and should be able to exercise their rights to vote as they please, and as we are seeing with the ongoing strike action, such actions should not be taken lightly.

Mr Speaker I am appalled. The decision to strike is not, as the Secretary of State would have you believe, "taken lightly". Such action is the last resort of entire industries who have been left with no other alternative to protect their job, earn for their families or protect their human rights. This Government's categorisation of this action as taken lightly betrays the contempt they hold for the working class, shame on him.

I have rarely seen such a double standard in this House or in any legislative body I have served in. On the one hand the Secretary of State argues that one cannot compel a member of any electing body, be that the electorate of the UK or any other society, to vote. On the other hand he argues that it is perfectly reasonable to compel members to vote. This Government does not govern at the pleasure of 50% of the population of the United Kingdom, yet govern it does. So I ask again Mr Speaker, why should teachers, nurses and doctors be held to a higher standard than the Government?
Lucas Hamilton
Labour MP for West Ham 2010-Onwards
Deputy Leader of the Labour Party: 2015-Onwards

Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer: 2015-Onwards
Mayor of London: 2000-2008
______
'Emergencies' have always been the pretext on which the safeguards of individual liberty have been eroded. - Friedrich Hayek
Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself. - Milton Friedman
Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. - Milton Friedman
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#13
Mr. Speaker,

The premise espoused by my Hon. colleague is simply flawed. To address his first statement, those who went on strike were not defending their jobs - they were being used as pawns by the Trade Unions that the Hon. member opposite is so fond of deferring to.

We are getting nowhere, furthermore, with this line of questioning that seeks to divide Britons based on class and income level. That is not the right way to govern, and that is no how the Conservative Government seeks to lead. We are a party for all Britons - working class and middle class, upper class and the poor. We care for all Britons and seek to unite our nation, not tear it apart as the Hon. member opposite would have us do.
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#14
Mr Speaker,

In May 2015, the Government released statistics that reveal approximately 10.4% of all English households experience fuel poverty. This is unchanged from 2012. What plans do the Government have to tackle it?
Emma Hollens
MP for Lewisham Deptford (2015 - )

"Progress is a nice word. But change is its motivator. And change has its enemies." 
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