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Press Cycle #25 - Manufacturing
#1
"What does the end of car production at Dagenham mean for the future of the British manufacturing industry, and what should be done about it?"

Closes 11:59 on 13/04/18

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Andy
Acting Head Admin
Speaker of the House of Commons
Advisor for the Labour Party, the Cabinet Office and the Home Office
Poll wrangler and election psephologist
Scandalmonger

I forget Andy has political opinions. I always just think of him as a Civil Servant in real life - Mac
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#2
For the past few decades, we have been rapidly moving towards a more an economically more-centralized world. There are some benefits to that process, and the United Kingdom has, by and large, benefited from the spread of globalization across the globe. However, we cannot play into a game racing to the bottom in an effort to 'stay competitive'. While the wealthy might have the ability to simply write off a factory and move across the globe, the thousands of people whose lives are irreversibly changed by this decision don't have the same luxury. Globalization has winners and losers. We cannot let the people of Dagenham lose because we lack the courage to lead a new path internationally. I am confident that, in the next election, the people will see the presentation of a very clear, unique vision for our future in this globalized world from Labour that will not forget the factory workers of Dagenham.
Dame Beatrice Oona Millar DBE MP FRSE RSA | Labour
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1992- )
Member of Parliament for Glasgow Hillhead (1987- )
Member of Parliament for Edinburgh Leith (1957-1959)

Formerly: Parminder Chawla, Joshua Bertram, Lillian Nichols, Gareth Edwards, Andrew Pearson, L Chris Havilland, Mack Aldritt
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#3
We live in an age where the advances in technology are unprecedented and I have no doubt change and advancement will continue at a rapid pace for many years to come. We live in a world where it is very possible that many of our jobs in the manufacturing industries will be replaced partly, or in full, by automated machines that require little overarching control. This is a concern for any worker. In my constituency, places like Consett are still recovering from the mining industry being closed in the 1980's, despite our local pit being profitable. Whilst we note the changing workplace and make-up of our economy we must move to protect jobs.

We must protect the working men and women of this country and we must have a fair tax system that adequately taxes corporations to ensure they pay their fair share of tax. This revenue could be used to fund small business grants or affordable loans for small to business sized businesses to encourage enterprise in the emerging technology and digital markets. This will help create new jobs that reflect the globalised world we are moving towards and replace those lost like those in Dagenham.
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#4
The announced closure of the Ford Plant in Dagenham is an unfortunate development both for the 3000 people who stand to lose their jobs and for the broader United Kingdom. This Government takes its commitment to the people of Dagenham exceptionally seriously and will do everything in our power to ensure that should this closure go ahead these people will not be lost for a generation like when the Tories decimated the mining communities in the 80s. The Government has already begun consultations on a solution to the problem that will hopefully see the plant remain open, work is one of the best ways to escape the poverty trap after all. However in case these consultations and negotiations prove to be fruitless, and to help all those left behind by 18yrs of Tory mismanagement of the economy, I can announce that this Budget will include substantial increases in investment towards Adult Skills, the New Deal and Job Centres to ensure that unemployment is not the end of the line for the thousands who are affected by this news, or the millions left behind by Tory mismanagement.
The Rt Hon Sir Dylan Macmillan MP
MP for Bedfordshire Mid (1983-Present)

Leader of Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (1992-Present)
Secretary of State for Energy 1987-1990

@Dylan_Macmillan
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#5
The closure of the Dagenham plant represents a failure by the Government to continue to provide the sort of economic environment Great Britain needs to thrive on the world stage. While Labour has allowed their union allies to drag down production with unofficial striking and work slowdowns only goes to show who's lot the Government has thrown in with. Their best ideas are retraining grants while doing nothing for the dignity, honor, or economic needs of the families who will be negatively impacted. This plant closing, and the loss of nearly 3,000 jobs shows that Labour policies are bad for Britain's economy and our economic standing around the world. 
Philip Porter
MP for Orkney and Shetlands (1983-Present)
Leader of the Liberal Democrats (1992-Present)
Liberal Democrats Spokesman for the Treasury (1992)



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#6
Today we live in an ever-changing ever world, one in which countries are opening up trade routes and doing other business with each other. There is much good in this as countries who previously had no ability to import or export certain materials for profit now have that ability to, they can also compete for corporations to produce their goods there as well. And while these are all good by-products of globalization we cannot deny there are substantial downsides. One of those downsides Dagenham just recently experienced when it lost Ford, and why? Not because our taxes are too low as the government has suggested or because manufacturing is on the way out. The real reason is that our taxes are too high, and our red tape is too strict, these are things Labor won't tell you because those are the only ideas they have. What we need in order to survive the new world is low corporate taxes, and investments in trade schools, without these essential things we cannot survive in the globalized economy.
"the fagnoglin"  Moray Mac Gill Fhaolain MP Aberdeen North 1964-Present

1973-1974 Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
1976-1978 Secretary of State for Transport
1978-1979 Secretary of State for Scotland
1979-1987 Shadow Secretary of State for Workers and Pensions
1992-Present Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Constitutional Affairs & Devolution

fmrly Sean Kapur fmr. Shadow Minister of Environment, Housing, and Ag 
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#7
The end of car production at Dagenham is testament to the failure of this Labour government to protect British workers from the onslaught of globalisation. Many of my parliamentary colleagues have simply got the wrong end of the stick: the solution is not to tax firms into oblivion, or to offer the typical patronizing, pitying and bleeding-heart 'sorry, better luck next time' non-response we've become so accustomed to from this Labour government, but to actually take steps to protect British manufacturing jobs from competition abroad.

This does not have to be a managed decline, and frankly British workers deserve a Conservative government willing to fight their corner when the going gets tough -- something that Labour is seemingly incapable of doing.

This Labour government is all bark and no bite. It is emaciated, toothless and ought to be put out of its misery. The loss of 3,000 manufacturing jobs in Dagenham is not just an 'unfortunate development', it is indisputable evidence of Labour's utterly disgraceful and, frankly, shameful anti-British economic agenda.
David Crawford MP 

MP for Reading West 1997 -
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#8
Press Cycle closed.
Idk
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#9
Labour: 23.5
 
Being in government sucks – because when something goes wrong, even if it’s nothing to do with you, people are going to blame you. This is really decent damage control. However, sadly, damage control has to be done when damage has been done. You also could’ve done well to respond more directly to the Tories’ claims and called them out, otherwise if left unchallenged people are going to eat them up.
 
Conservatives: 26.5
 
You really went in for Labour here – perhaps unfairly, sure, but it resonated. What an alternate could be would’ve resonated more, and your win would’ve been more decisive, had it been someone from the actual frontbench giving an offer of what that alternative could be.
 
Influence Points Awarded to:
 
Alwyn Thomas: “I can announce that this budget will include substantial increases in investment towards Adult Skills, the New Deal and Job Centres to ensure that unemployment is not the end of the line for the thousands who are affected by this news, or the millions left behind by Tory mismanagement.”  The Chancellor offering a way to avoid this happening again always rings well. Also, the little strike against the Tories was effective – if only it was done more.
 
Simon Calvert: “Their best ideas are retraining grants while doing nothing for the dignity, honour or economic needs of the families who will be negatively impacted. This plant closing, and the loss of nearly 3,000 jobs shows that Labour policies are bad for Britain’s economy and our economic standing around the world.” Is this a fair accusation? Probably not. Do the public buy it? Yes, probably. The accusation that the government aren’t doing enough for the actual people involved is also a fair point.
 
Sean Kapur: “What we need in order to survive the new world is low corporate taxes, and investment in trade schools, without these essential things we cannot survive in the global economy.” The first and only Tory to offer a solid alternative theory as to how this situation could’ve been avoided – too bad he isn’t a frontbencher.
Idk
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