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Labour Leadership Election 2016
#1
The Labour Leadership Election rules are as follows:

Nomination

- Each candidate requires a nomination and a seconder.
- Candidates may nominate themselves but may not second themselves.
- Nominations are open from now until midday Sunday
- Nominations must be made using the following form

Name of Candidate:
Name of Proposer:
Name of Seconder:
Declaration of Candidate's consent:

Timeline

48 hours of campaigning and voting
Players' votes must be submitted before midday on Tuesday
Results will be declared on Tuesday

The results of the MPs vote will be calculated based on players' factions and influences. The final result will be based on players' votes and the A-Team's assessment of the campaign material.

Campaigning

On each Campaigning Day (starting and ending at midday), each candidate has 6 hours of campaigning time to spend. MPs other than the candidates have 2 hours each per day to spend, and may wish to use these to help their preferred candidate. Campaigning time can be spent as follows:

Speech: 2 hours
Canvassing: 1 hour
Poster/Leaflet: 1 hour

Canvassing here means a summary of a conversation with a party member on 2-3 policy areas, either in a bullet point description or through a script of talking points the candidate would use.

Unused hours cannot be carried over to the next day.
Andy
Advisor for the Labour Party, the Home Office and the Department for Environment, Communities, and the Regions
Poll wrangler and election psephologist
Scandalmonger

I forget Andy has political opinions. I always just think of him as a Civil Servant in real life - Mac
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#2
Name of Candidate: Amelia Lockhart
Name of Proposer: William Flanagan
Name of Seconder: Meredith Hawkins
Declaration of Candidate's consent: Consent.
Edward Adeyemi
Member of Parliament for
Streatham

Shadow Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union
Labour Party
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#3
Name of Candidate: Alex Uyanik
Name of Proposer: Alex Uyanik
Name of Seconder: Bjørn Amundsen
Declaration of Candidate's consent: Alex Uyanik
Dr Alex Uyanik | MP for Walthamstow (1979-1987, 1992-Present) | Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Transport and the Regions (2016-)

"An Anti-Democratic decision cannot be made with votes" - Erdal Inonu
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#4
Day 1 of campaigning begins. Ms Lockhart, Mr Uyanik, the best of luck to you!
Andy
Advisor for the Labour Party, the Home Office and the Department for Environment, Communities, and the Regions
Poll wrangler and election psephologist
Scandalmonger

I forget Andy has political opinions. I always just think of him as a Civil Servant in real life - Mac
Reply
Thanks given by:
#5
Amelia Lockhart, MP for Hull East and former Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, gave her first speech to the Community Union’s Conference [2 hours].

[Image: Jacinda+Ardern+Labour+Party+Congress+201...gTGRJl.jpg]

Thank you ladies and gentleman – it is a great pleasure to be here at the conference of Community. You, as a trade union, are leading the way in protecting workers rights, stemming the power of unscrupulous employers, and campaigning for a fairer society. As we all know, trade unions have struggled to adapt to a changing economy, but your efforts to organise workers in the service sector are truly inspiring.

We come together in the run-up to the EU referendum, something that will impact every Community member.  In just a few weeks whoever is elected as Labour leader will be thrust into campaigning to keep Britain in the EU. I know how important the EU is for Britain, and I will defend British membership with all my heart. My family’s history demands me to do nothing else.

From the ashes of war, my mother escaped. To a nation re-born, my mother arrived. Aged just six, my mother had seen so much – as Italian fascism crumbled. Over the course of the next 70 years, my mother did so much – as Britain changed. She saw war destroy a continent, but then saw that continent come back together again, first as a European Community and then as a European Union.

And as Britain changed from an Empire to a leading member of Europe, my father – a Yorkshireman born in poverty and deprivation – was able to not only lift his horizons, but to also give his children the chance of a better future. From a miner’s son to a MP’s father, he aimed high throughout his life and – due to the support of Labour Governments – was able to succeed.

It is my parents’ story – of adversity overcome, challenges resisted, and barriers torn down – that motivates me to stand here today. It compels me to stand here in support of peace when my Italian grandparents experienced the horrors of war; it compels me to stand here in support of our trade unions when my Yorkshire grandparents experienced unsafe working conditions promoted by unscrupulous employers in our mines; and it compels me to stand here today in support of our public services which elevate the condition of us all when my ancestors experienced grinding, eternal poverty.

My parents could not have moved so far away from the experiences of their ancestors on their own. They succeeded not through their individual endeavour alone, but through the efforts of millions together. We all contributed to their story, and continue to do so, as they contribute to ours. The ties that bind us all – invisible and indivisible – lift us all up together as one society, one community, and one humanity.

“From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs” continues to mean something in the 21st Century. It matters for the support we give each other in our families, communities, and nation. And that support matters for us all to rise and succeed, to weather any storm, and to pass on a legacy worthy of our children.

But in recent years our willingness to provide that support has diminished. The Conservative Government has been all to willing to shatter our public services and deal another blow to our communities, especially the poorest. The Welfare Reform and Work Bill 2016 is just another blow against working people. If the Bill passes, we will, as a nation, be calling time on our crusade against child poverty, first started by New Labour. If this Bill passes we will, as a nation, be no longer serious about tackling in-work poverty, as thousands of people become poorer employed. If this Bill passes we will, as a nation, be saying some children no longer deserve support simply because they are their parents’ third child.

Because of Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is opposed to these changes. Never have I been prouder to be a member of Labour when we stand together in defence of working people, children, and the vulnerable. And never have I been more ashamed to be a MP when in the House of Commons, we have Tories wanting to tax widows for needing too much support.

I want to lead a Labour Party that commits every penny it can to funding our public services and welfare state properly, but also commits every ounce of energy to supporting our communities revitalise themselves. This requires so much more than money, but it can be done with an ethical government leading the way. The spirit of partnership that enabled our country to rebuild after the Second World War – that provided my mother with hope and a home – must be unleashed once again. And yes, conference, trade unionists will be at its heart of this partnership.

For without trade unions, we can never secure the society we all desire. Clement Attlee, in his timeless words, described it as a “society of free men and women - free from poverty, free from fear, able to develop to the full their faculties in co-operation with their fellows, everyone giving and having the opportunity to give service to the community.” Spoken in 1951, these words still mean something 65 years later. We have marched so far, conference, but we have so far still to go.

And at a time when the Conservatives offer a narrow, negative and small vision of what Britain is, our spirit of partnership can offer an expansive, positive, and hopeful vision of what Britain can be. There is no doubt our nation faces challenges of great enormity: the waves of change are crashing onto the shores of Britain. The Conservatives are content to do nothing; that is their decision. And the result is those waves pulling thousands underwater: struggling to get a job, struggling to put food on the table, struggling to reach financial security. We can do so much better than this; we must do so much better than this.

It is said that some generations walk on a path they neither made nor discovered, but that they accept. We will not be that generation. We will march on a path we decided to a future we choose.

There are grave challenges facing our country, and it is time for bold leadership. This Government is tired at a time of great threats, but also great opportunities. In 1960, John F. Kennedy proclaimed the United States “today cannot afford to be either tired or Tory”. After six long, dark years of Conservative Government, neither can Britain. The Labour Party, under my leadership, will stand ready to lead a Government that takes our nation out of the darkness, and towards a better future.

Conference, in just a few weeks our nation’s prosperity could be endangered forever. This Conservative Government has decided to gamble with our incomes, our trade, and our investment. From the funding that rebuilt Liverpool to the Japanese investment that built factories in Sunderland, from the immigration that keeps our NHS alive to Europol that keeps the arm of British justice long, the Conservatives have decided to put it all at risk. A vote to leave the European Union will cast our nation adrift from the largest market in the world, setback any chance for growth in our most deprived regions, and force the Government to spend years unpicking ties when policy efforts should be elsewhere.

There is no left wing case for leaving the European Union. Don’t let anyone cloak themselves in the values of our movement in one breath, and then advocate for a ‘LEAVE’ vote in the next. Our values of solidarity, community, and peace demand us to be on the frontline in the defence of the European Union in this referendum – and then on the frontline of reform. We cannot trust the Tories to make the case for EU membership.

Labour must be on the frontline in the fight for a better future. Britain cannot afford years more of the status quo. I am ready for the biggest fight of my career, and I know I will be campaigning with all of you as Leader of the Labour Party. Let’s get to it.
Amelia Lockhart
MP for Hull East (2010 - )

Leader of the Labour Party (2016 - )
Shadow Secretary of State for Women and Equalities (2016 - )
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#6
Amelia Lockhart, MP for Hull East, canvassed Labour Party members at the Progress Conference [1 hour]. She focused on foreign affairs:

To one member, she said:

“Failing to renew our nuclear deterrent will put Britain's national security in danger. You don't make the world safer by making Britain weaker. For as long as other nations possess nuclear weapons, we must possess them. No nation or leader will look to Britain, see us adopt unilateralism and be persuaded to do the same. We must renew our nuclear deterrent to keep our nation safe. If we were to disarm, we would be outsourcing the ultimate defence of our nation to other powers in NATO. This would be a criminal constraint on our sovereignty and deeply damaging to our country. Under my leadership, we will once again return to the situation where Labour wholeheartedly backs its own policy and uphold an at-sea deterrent.”

To another member, she said:

“The strength of our defence industry ensures the strength of our nation around the world. More must be done and can be done to promote our defence industry, support innovation, and keep communities safe. We cannot, however, keep our nation free and safe on the cheap: since 2010, the Conservatives have presided over real term cuts to defence spending. Experts have consistently warned that cuts to spending have placed British security in danger. This is unacceptable, and I am committed to changing it. As Prime Minister I will increase the defence budget in real terms every single year, and spend more at home to develop domestic capability. There is no reason why we should rely on overseas capability when we have the potential to develop the capabilities to do that right here at home.”

To a third, she said:

“I am passionately pro-European. I resigned from the Shadow Cabinet because I could not support a leader who was equivocal on membership. While I don’t expect every MP and member to support membership, I will be campaigning for Britain to remain. Nonetheless the former PM’s deal is very disappointing, and shows how the Government lacks imagination. To focus on ‘ever-closer union’ opt outs, but not Single Market completion was wrong-headed. Britain needs to stay in the EU and push for more reform, not storm out with irreparable harm to the poorest communities in Britain.”
Amelia Lockhart
MP for Hull East (2010 - )

Leader of the Labour Party (2016 - )
Shadow Secretary of State for Women and Equalities (2016 - )
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#7
Speech 1 (2 Hours)

Quote:Thank you for having me here today, I'm delighted to be here with you all. But despite this, I wish it wasn't necessary. We are here to fight another leadership election because of the fear of a small few in the power of our social movement, one dedicated to radical change in this country. I'd therefore like to begin by thanking Jeremy for his service and everything that he's done for this movement and our country. I've known him for many years and I can tell you these past months have been personally taxing on him. Recognising that I'd like to thank him again, I'd also like to extend a very sincere, "good luck" to my opponent in this contest. We will have fierce disagreements about what the past few months have meant for our movement and where we will go from here, but I hope this will be an open, honest and civil debate.

Friends, again and again we have seen the Tories finding new ways to impose austerity upon the most vulnerable people in this country. Just recently we saw a backbencher attempt to add an even more punitive measure onto an already punitive welfare reform bill. Let's be clear, austerity is a political choice, a choice that in the minds of the Tories is justified as punishing those they see as undeserving. Isn't it wrong that in one of the richest countries in the world that people are force to resort to food banks? Isn't it an outrage that, dissatisfied with their cruelty up to now, a Tory MP comes along and says, "Actually I'd like to be even crueller"? It's long past the time that the travesties of austerity should have been ended; I pledge to you that when I become leader and then Prime Minister that we will completely reverse the culture and language around these issues. This means ending the disastrous bedroom tax, providing the NHS with the funds it needs, ending the public sector pay cap and ensuring schools across the country have the resources they need to deliver for every child, not just those lucky enough to live in wealthy areas with a disproportionately good system. Destitution and poverty are not lifestyle choices, they are the result of a system that has failed, creaking under its own weight, exacerbated by austerity. Let's end this failed system and begin to build a better tomorrow, together!

If we are to build this better tomorrow, we must acknowledge that all too often London and the M4 corridor has been prioritised at the expense of the rest of the country. That doesn't mean that these parts of the country don't have problems, believe me I've represented a London constituency for a long time and I can tell you there are some serious issues, but once you travel north, you see that while there are of course similar problems that take on similar shapes, there is a particular kind of deprivation and a sense that things have progressively deteriorated, even under the Labour governments of the past two decades. I want to change that. The National Investment Bank will be a much needed way to direct investment into the economy, yes in London and the M4 corridor, but with regional branches of it and a mandate to prioritise the long neglected parts of our country. It will also invest funds to improve infrastructure and to provide access to SME's in all parts of this nation. This means regions like the East Midlands, the North East and the West and Wales, which have had long term issues with regard to issues like unemployment, poverty, poor infrastructure and bad transport links, will be raised to the level of the rest of the country. By re-balancing our economy away from London and the M4 corridor we will not only provide the conditions for decent, well paying jobs across the country, we will be a healthier, fairer and more equal country for it.

I touched on it earlier, and I'd like to expand and be clear about it now, the infrastructure of this country and its transport links are unfit for purpose. If we want to reach our potential in the 21st century, we must modernise and improve not only the existing infrastructure, but even our very definition of it. What I mean by that is that increasingly, the internet has become an essential component in the lives of so many people and some might even say a bit too much in my case. Regardless, we should redefine the internet and its role in society, considering it an essential piece of infrastructure, alongside our roads. With that in mind, under my leadership Labour would seek to bring high speed internet to every household and offer the resources for councils across the country to provide high speed connections even if the private sector refused to do so. We all know about the disaster that is our privatised rail system, prices keep increasing, the quality of the service keeps dropping and commuters suffer the consequences - I would see to it that our trains are brought back into public ownership as quickly and as efficiently as possible. However, we must be mindful that we don't limit ourselves to trains. Yes - they are vital, but for many, access to other forms of public transportation is lacklustre for such an important component of everyday life. This is why, under my leadership, Labour will make it our policy to not only simply improve the quality and access to bus services for towns and villages across the country, but give local communities the power they need to run community bus routes that can connect hamlets, villages and towns across the country.

Thank you all for having me here, together we can continue to bring forward the radical agenda that will re-energise and revolutionise this country. We can and will bring radical change to this country, lets work, together for a victory in this contest and then a victory at the next general election. Thank you.

Speech 2 (2 Hours)

Quote:Thank you for having me here today to speak to you all about an issue that is at the core of our movement. Workers rights in the UK, it's no secret that this government has had a grudge to bear with the trade union movement and that the laws governing trade unions in this country are among the most repressive in Europe. The Labour Party must always stand shoulder to shoulder with workers and ensure that we create the conditions for improving pay, improving conditions and ultimately a more productive, fair and healthy workplace for all.

The most basic principle that should be and is at the core of my campaign and will be at the core of my leadership, is the principle that if you go and work you should be able to support yourself. That is why in line with previous policy, I would see to it that the Real Living Wage is given to all workers, regardless of their age. Is the labour of a 21 year old at the same job as a 26 year old worth less? Do they have lower costs to live? I don't think so, they should and will be paid the same once I become Prime Minister. This policy will raise the wages of millions of workers across the country, lifting them away from the abyss of in-work poverty and into a dignified standard of living. Businesses too will benefit from a populace that has access to disposable income, this will spur a sustainable period of growth for business and for the living standards of people every where.

Alongside this change, we must also engage with the reality that our Trade Union Laws are tilted too strongly in favour of the employer. This means that workers in unions are unable to engage in action that would protect them from unscrupulous employers who seek to extract every ounce of profit from the productivity of those workers. That is why, we as a party must reverse these repressive laws so that working people across this country can stand together in collective action and solidarity and deliver higher pay, safer work places and more secure jobs for people across the country. We must also work to bring about more worker power in the running of companies, this so that worker can have their say on the direction of the companies that they work in and that they know the workings of. That is why we will ensure in government that 40% of board members are representative workers, so that they have a substantial voice at the table. This will ensure that the concerns of workers cannot be ignored and that workers will be able to have some say over the direction and who is involved in the running of their company.

Let me be clear, women's rights are workers right and human rights therefore, we must also ensure that the gender pay gap is properly dealt with, with substantial punishments for non-compliant companies, under my premiership gone will be the days where a woman's work can be considered less valuable than a mans. We must also acknowledge that there is still work to do on the issue of LGBTQ+ rights, often discrimination against them goes if not unreported then under-reported, that is a reflection upon all of us as a society and as a party. That is why we will ensure that there is robust legislation protecting LGBTQ+ people from discrimination in the work place and in society at large. Workers, friends are diverse people who come from a range of backgrounds, for our movements attempt to liberate them, to provide them with the power to lead to mean anything we must also fight alongside brothers and sisters across all lines to empower them.

Friends, when the Labour party is in power we must fight for everyone's rights in the workplace and together we will make it possible for workers to have control over their work places not only for their good, but for the good of all of the UK. Thank you so much.

Canvassing (1 Hour)

Quote:Alex Uyanik spoke with members after a rally in Liverpool, he touched on tax policy, climate change and mental health issues:

To one member he said:

"We need to, as a country make sure that every penny that is owed to our country is recovered by HMRC. That is why I would fund it properly and close the loopholes that are exploited. Every penny that is stowed away in Panama, or on the Virgin Islands is money that is stolen from our public services and the people that are expected to make up the shortfall are often regular working people. That isn't right and it's time that we say clearly when we're in government, enough is enough."

To another he said:
"The simple fact is that the gravest long term danger to this country, is climate change and although it may seem like the threshold has been passed, there is still plenty we can do to try an alleviate the worst of it. That's why we need to invest strongly into research into climate change adaptation, carbon capture and of course into energy efficiency and renewable energy. As well as this Labour under my leadership would have a Green Investment Bank formed to work alongside the National Investment Bank to provide the funds for low and zero carbon enterprises and renewable energy projects."

To a third he said:
"It is long past time that we provided parity of esteem for mental health in this country and matched that with funding. A large proportion of people go through their day-to-day lives with mental health problems that go undiagnosed and untreated, these problems are often exacerbated by a lack of access to adequate care. That's why the Labour party must advocate for complete health coverage including mental health issues so that we are meeting the responsibility to provide health care to those who need it."

Poster (1 Hour):

[Image: q5P8yem.jpg]
Dr Alex Uyanik | MP for Walthamstow (1979-1987, 1992-Present) | Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Transport and the Regions (2016-)

"An Anti-Democratic decision cannot be made with votes" - Erdal Inonu
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#8
Amelia Lockhart, MP for Hull East and Labour Party leadership contender, spoke to members, constituents, and the press at Hull City Hall. 

[Image: jLDXyQD.jpg]

Ladies and gentleman,

It is great to be back home in Hull. After launching my campaign in London, and speaking to Community Union, it was obvious that my next stop would be here. Today I am going to be talking about how far we have come in lifting educational standards and aspiration, but also how much further we have to go. Our city’s experience in education is illuminating, and I believe the next Labour Government can draw lessons from it.

While Hull achieved its best ever results in Key Stage 2, we still are failing to ensure everyone meets the 5 A* to C ‘gold standard’ at GSCE. While 11 new secondary schools and 3 new primary schools have been built, and the facilities at a further 11 special needs schools enhanced, this was due to funding provided by the Building Schools for the Future – a programme recklessly cancelled by the Coalition Government. Under New Labour, and taken together with the rapid reductions in child poverty, we can see significant progress being made in ensuring every child succeeds and that no one is left behind.

But as we cast our gaze wider, we can see serious issues in the current Government’s policy on education, attainment, and aspiration. Between 2013 and 2015, an estimated 260 children centres closed, and many more are unable to offer anything other than a skeleton service due to lack of adequate funding. Ever more vulnerable families are finding it difficult to access the support they need, support that families in Hull and across the country have found critically useful. With Children Centres closing at the rate they are, any Government rhetoric on 'closing the gap' and improving children's life chances is contradicted by the facts. The new Prime Minister, whoever they are, must set out quickly a strategy for securing the future of children's centres if they are serious about creating a country where “dreams and aspirations of the peoples of our great island home can be achieved.”

The Government may have started talking about the importance of enlarging ‘life chances’ and social mobility but they have spent the past five years blocking action and rolling back the progress we made. And in the same legislation that they place ‘life chances’ at the pinnacle of measurement, we see policies that will prevent families from succeeding in work. Over two-thirds of children in poverty are in families with at least one parent working. It is dangerous to assume, as the Government does, that worklessness is the only barrier to social mobility, life chances, and poverty reduction. There are thousands of families here in Hull who are in work, but do not earn enough to live without the support from tax credits. It is those thousands of working families who will be hit hard, and the consequences will be generational as children struggle at school and in work: their life chances will be drastically curtailed as a result of the freeze in tax credits.

Labour did so much on improving educational attainment, and reducing inequalities in schools which widened life chances. But while celebrating our record, we must reflect on the fact we did not do enough. Unless we are frank with ourselves, we will condemn millions to continuous poverty, low aspirations, and failure.

The last Labour Government prioritised lifting up the quality of London’s schools, which were the worst in the country. Every educational initiative focused on transforming schools in the capital. And we were right to. But while we lifted the standards of London schools to such an extent that many of them are the best in the country, we neglected coastal and rural communities especially on the East Coast. This has resulted in white working-class pupils suffering as their schools lagged long behind London. And they have fallen further behind under the Conservatives. Successful interventions such as Teach First start in London and move to the big cities quickly, but then take a long time to reach schools outside the metropolitan areas. We know that Teach First has resulted in hundreds of committed, talented teachers going into tough schools and lifting their standards. But it took 13 years for Teach First to be expanded into Great Yarmouth and Thanet, for example.

Not only are rural areas, coastal communities, and towns of our nation forgotten when it comes to educational reform, they lack the funding provided to schools in our bigger cities. Many schools in London are able to operate thriving after-school club, but many schools outside of the capital have been forced to cut the funding to such clubs and see fewer pupils in rural areas be able to access such clubs as public transport provision shrivels and the cost of transport rises. And this has an enormous impact on the success or otherwise of our poorer primary school children. Research from the Nuffield Trust shows that poorer primary children who had taken part in after-school clubs were found to get better results at age 11 than peers who had not.

All of this cumulates into a crisis of attainment in many of our schools. We cannot place our heads in the sand when it comes to the struggles of white working-class kids. The institutional neglect over decades has condemned millions of kids. And it means while 61% of disadvantaged Indian children achieve five good GCSEs, just 32% of white British children do. Indeed white working class boys, in receipt of free school meals, perform less well at GCSE than almost any other group of pupils.

Of course, there are still enormous challenges facing children from ethnic minority backgrounds. It is obvious to us all that the legacy of past deprivation casts a shadow long into the future for all children. Poor children do worse at school because they lack access to the same resources and opportunities as their better off peers. And as housing becomes more expensive, only rich parents are able to move within the catchment area of better schools, especially in the bigger cities. The impact of poverty on educational achievement starts young, and being passed from generation to generation.

But while general factors are important, it does not explain why white working class kids do worse than similarly deprived kids from other backgrounds. Therefore, we must place as strong a focus on tackling educational inequality experienced by white working class kids as we do on anyone else. That starts by shifting the priority for school reform, away from the big cities to the towns, coastal areas, and rural communities of Britain.

A Labour Government under my leadership will ensure any cuts made to after-school clubs will be reversed by providing £1 billion of funding to schools over five years. Most, if not all, of this funding will be provided to the schools in areas thus far ignored by the current government, where the crisis of white working-class attainment is so strong. This funding will also be used to support and expand breakfast clubs provided by schools across the country. We will ensure that the provision of a healthy breakfast is not paid for by shifting funding from other school priorities, but supported in its own way. Before the next election, Labour will also set out how we are going to ensure that no kid is denied access to extracurricular activities because of a lack of income.

Some politicians – mainly Conservative ones – have promised selective education as the answer to giving children from poorer backgrounds the chance to succeed. Not only does this promise fly in the face of the evidence, it flies in the face of our values. Splitting children up from their friends, and determining their whole life at 11, is cruel, stupid, and borderline barbaric. They do not assist social mobility as only 3% of grammar school pupils receive free school meals, and they gain very little at all. Even worse, kids in selective areas who don't get into grammar schools do worse than they would in a comprehensive system. They are elitist institutions that entrench, rather than disrupt or disperse, privilege. Thankfully, grammar schools exist in only a few areas of this country. In part, this is due to the last Labour Government establishing a general prohibition on the creation of any new all-selective schools. But where they still exist they are entrenching inequality and preventing social mobility. Therefore the next Labour Government will abolish Grammar Schools fully in England, and working with the Northern Irish Executive to remove them there. The life chances of thousands matters more than the voice of a few parents desperate to preserve the advantages of relatively privileged kids.

The cycle of white working-class underachievement and poverty sets in early – far earlier than any of us truly realise. The gap definitely exists at age five, if not even earlier, and widens as the children get older. Attempting to rectify the inequality at university level with free tuition is the educational equivalent of closing the stable door after the horse has bolted. Indeed even by secondary school, it is often too late. This reality doesn’t mean that we should do less at secondary school and university, but if we are really serious about tackling educational underachievement, we must focus on pre-school and primary. That is what a truly progressive, socialist Government would do – and it is what I will do as Leader.

One of the first things we must do is reinforce the statutory limit on the size of primary school classes. More than 100,000 infants are being taught in primary school classes larger than the statutory maximum. Schools have become adept at winning exemptions at a time when reduced funding means they cannot meet their obligations. Increasing class sizes are undermining pupils’ educational progress and adding to teachers’ already excessive workload. Pupils cannot thrive crammed into workspaces designed for much smaller groups of pupils. Teachers cannot teach without the time or opportunity to provide pupils with the individual attention they need.

I want schools to use the ingenuity utilised to avoid the statutory maximum on class sizes on teaching kids better. Therefore, I will enforce the requirements on class sizes, introduced by the last Labour Government. The Coalition enabled this mess of mega-classes, but Labour will end it. We are not going to provide a single penny to Free Schools in areas of surplus class places until the shortages elsewhere are dealt with. It is a common-sense policy.

Of course, ladies and gentleman, what I have outlined today is just the start. Tackling inequality in attainment is more than just what happens at school. It requires policies for every year of life, and every step of a child’s development. It will require all Government departments working together, and entire communities cooperating with one goal in mind. That is why the Government’s refusal to even measure child poverty, while condemning thousands more children to a life of deprivation, is so devastating. We cannot ensure that every kid succeeds if too many kids live in families where even work is not enough for financial security. You cannot be serious about life chances if you want to make millions of working families poorer.

The Government just doesn’t get it. They think you can make work pay by ensuring workers earn less. They think child poverty just doesn’t matter despite it increasing under their watch. They just don’t get it. We need something different. We need a national crusade against child poverty and against the poverty of aspiration in many communities. This crusade will take a lot of effort and I will not pretend it will be easy. But it must be done – future generations demand it.

Thank you.
Amelia Lockhart
MP for Hull East (2010 - )

Leader of the Labour Party (2016 - )
Shadow Secretary of State for Women and Equalities (2016 - )
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#9
[Canvass, 1hr]

Bjørn Amundsen, Labour MP for Bristol West, spoke to Labour members in his home constituency in favour of leadership contender Alex Uyanik.

He began by speaking to a student at Bristol University.

“As a student, you have borne the brunt of the Tory austerity pet project. Be it astronomical rises in tuition fees, which will now leave the aspirational like you with debts of around £50,000; unfairly low wages, which result in an inability to pay bills and everyday costs; or the spiralling costs of transport to and from university, which any simply cannot afford. But I believe that the clock is rapidly running out on this harmful economic policy, that has wrecked only hardship on students like yourself. This is why i’m backing Uyanik for the leadership of our party. A government led by him will abolish tuition fees, and make moves to forgive outstanding debt; will ensure that all workers have access to the living wage; and will renationalise the railways to bring down prices and improve the service. With Alex, we will be poised for victory – and ready to restructure what this country looks like for students.”

He then spoke to a local trade union member.

“We both know that trade unions and workers have been getting a raw deal for far too long. Thatcher’s anti-union policies of old, the ones that you and I fought together against, have been long accepted as standard by the soft left of our party. I don’t believe that this is good enough for workers or unions – and I don’t believe that the next Labour government should support their continuation. This is part of the reason that I’m backing Alex Uyanik for the leadership of our party. His government, when we win the next election, will repeal the repressive trade union laws that have sought to take power out of the hands of us, the many hard workers of this country, and instead hand them to the exploitative big business that sign huge checks to keep the Tory party going. But Alex will go further than just repeal. He has a plan to create better and fairer conditions for workers in this country. His government would ensure that every worker gains access to the real living wage, ensuring that each and every person is guaranteed a just sum for their hard labour. Alex has stood by the side of unions and workers for more than seventy years – and will continue to fight for the best deal for them, not big business, when in government.”

Finally, he spoke to an unemployed gentleman.

“This government has abandoned those who are unemployed in this country, and instead of helping individuals like yourself get back into work through skills development and training, now favours using you as a scapegoat to blame when their economic policy goes tits up. I don’t believe this is just, I don’t believe it’s right – frankly I believe it’s a disgusting show of arrogance by an out of touch, elitist class of Etonian MPs that dominate the cabinet. And I know that my friend Alex Uyanik shares this view, and will act swiftly to reverse the awful situation that many unemployed people now find themselves in. A government that he leads will end the bedroom tax, reverse real term benefit cuts and commit to full regional employment – so that if you want a job, you can get one. This is part of why I’m backing Alex, because he is a compassionate leader, who has stood by the worst off in society for more than seventy years. He can, and will, redefine for the better how our country looks. If you want real change and real leadership, you must vote for Alex.”

[Poster, 1hr]

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MP for Bristol West

#ANARCHISE THE NATION

(In previous lives: violated a confidence and supply agreement, tried to fight a man on Eton's nine-hole golf course, released a leaflet torpedoing ones own party and was likened to an M&M shovelling money into a fireplace)
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Day 2
Andy
Advisor for the Labour Party, the Home Office and the Department for Environment, Communities, and the Regions
Poll wrangler and election psephologist
Scandalmonger

I forget Andy has political opinions. I always just think of him as a Civil Servant in real life - Mac
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Votes for the Labour Leader must be received by midday Tuesday 26th. Please PM your ballot to both Andy and Steve.

Ballot paper:
Amelia Lockhart [ ]
Alex Uyanik [ ]
Andy
Advisor for the Labour Party, the Home Office and the Department for Environment, Communities, and the Regions
Poll wrangler and election psephologist
Scandalmonger

I forget Andy has political opinions. I always just think of him as a Civil Servant in real life - Mac
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Amelia Lockhart, MP for Hull East, spoke to a Shelter event in Manchester on homelessness, housing, and renting.

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Ladies and gentlemen,

It is a great honour to be here today, conversing with Shelter and listening to your ideas. I wanted to listen to the experts, the people who work on the ground, and who know far more about this topic than any politician.

For nearly 50 years, your work on homelessness and housing has informed public debate. But politicians have often not met the high standard you expect of us on this policy area because of cowardice and conservatism. And it has created a situation, developed over decades, of communities disfigured by dodgy landlords, homelessness, and a lack of available homes. Over the next 50 years, our generation – and the generation that succeeds us – will have to work hard to end homelessness. I am up for the fight.

The issue of housing has shot up the political agenda as the extent of the Government’s failure becomes clear. Rising rents and skyrocketing house prices, combined with low levels of house building, is creating a reckoning in country that could have devastating consequences if left unchecked.

On any one night in England, there are estimated to be over 2,700 people sleeping rough. This is by half since 2010. Over 100,000 people applied to their local authority for help with their situation, deeming themselves to be homeless. But as you have critically argued, the Government’s statistics shamefully underestimate the situation. Survey data suggests that around 14% of people have experienced homelessness themselves, while 32% of people knew someone who had. And millions more are at risk: they are living pay pack to pay pack, and just one shock away from trouble. They are just one payday loan away from a crisis. Just one decision by a landlord to hike up the rent or evict tenants altogether away from being homeless – dependent on overstretched and struggling local councils to cope.

100,000 children are homeless or living in temporary accommodation. The numbers of homeless young people was estimated by one study to be three times larger than the Government statistics show. Even then the authors of that study said their estimations still underestimated the extent of the issue. There could be as many as 1.3 million young people, aged 16 to 24, who are homeless across the course of a year. This would cover every single young person who slept rough, stayed in a hostel, sofa-surfed or slept in a car. This is a national scandal that the Government ignores, and gleefully commits to exacerbate with its welfare reforms.

The causes of homelessness can often be hideously complex, rooted in individual circumstances around relationships and friendship, but they can also be incredibly simple, caused by callous landlords. They can be linked to personal issues such as mental health conditions including addiction and experiences of the criminal justice system. But they can also be connected to wider factors such as poverty, housing affordability, and welfare reforms.

On the latter, I know that Shelter is extremely concerned about the impact of the Benefit Cap tightening – as am I. You have shown persuasively that containing housing benefit in the Cap could result in thousands of families being unable to afford basic necessities because the cost of housing is so high. It is deeply concerning that a family with two children sharing a room could see their benefits reduced by £50 a week in just over 15% of local authorities, and by more than £100 a week in 8% of local authorities. You cannot have a “more just, more equal society”, as the Prime Minister claims we are moving towards, if children are in the firing line for deficit reduction.

But the Government’s lack of compassion only reflects a larger trend as a nation. No longer are we willing to be charitable towards the homeless and to give them a helping hand. Instead we see too many examples of what is termed ‘defensive architecture’ used against the homeless. We have seen spikes put in housing developments, estate agents, and a store of Tesco to deter homelessness. Too embarrassed and ashamed of the failings of our nation they would much rather push them out of side and out of mind. As a business, you don’t tackle homelessness by putting up spikes on your business premise. You make a commitment to society to support rough sleepers get back on your feet. That is how, as responsible stakeholders, you can make the contribution required to society and our country.

Just because you are homeless and sleeping rough does not mean you should be placed in more danger by the decisions of businesses. But that is what these spikes do. Rough sleepers are more likely to be a victim of a crime than to perpetuate one. They will die earlier than all of us, suffering from problems we could never perceive. It is callous, inhumane and evil to worsen the situation of rough sleepers in an attempt to fatten your profit margin by using these spikes.

Britain should no longer accept companies preaching malice towards those who cannot help themselves. We cannot accept companies using private means to raise more barriers to those who just want the tiniest bit of comfort on a cold, winter night. The Labour Party should not accept it. No one in Britain has the right to stop law abiding people who are down on their luck using legal means to survive. To the big business owners, prosperous shareholders, and the managers of giant corporations, I say: you have the power to change lives; I hope you will use it to lift up everyone and not to punish those who have already been punished.

We will ban the use of spikes to deter rough sleeping that are, as the Mayor of London argues, ‘ugly, self-defeating & stupid’. We will also give citizens the right to lodge objections to planning applications because they adopt measures that put rough sleepers in danger. Councillors will have to pay heed to these objections when they consider planning permission.  

We will be expecting a change in how councils treat rough sleepers. They are not people to be ashamed of, but our fellow citizens in need of a helping hand. They are not criminals to stigmatise, but our fellow human beings to love and cherish. They are not individuals deserving of our contempt, but sons and daughters deserving of our understanding. So it is time to end the criminalisation of rough sleeping and homelessness pursued by too many councils. From Hackney slapping a penalty of up to £1,000 on anyone engaging in ‘anti-social behaviour, including rough sleeping, to Oxford banning rough sleeping, there is a rising tide of intolerance. It often mirrors the crimes and violence perpetuated against homeless people by individuals.

Let us take the case of Oxford Council. They claim the ban on rough sleeping is to force people into support and accommodation. But Crisis argues that this risks forcing people with previous drug and alcohol problems into hostels where lots of people will have drug and alcohol problems themselves. That is not a situation we should be forcing rough sleepers into. If people are choosing to live on the streets and not in accommodation, we should be understanding and not punitive. A fine won’t solve the problem, but will push individuals further into trouble.

It is clear that Public Space Protection Orders are the source of this criminalisation. They allow councils to effectively criminalise behaviours that Westminster has not said are criminal within a specific area. Mainly used to target the homeless, they give them fines that cannot be paid and a criminal record that prevents individuals from getting a job and accessing housing. It is not too much of an exaggeration to say they violate certain basic rights of the poorest and the most vulnerable. I could not put it better than Liberty who said “if somebody is forced to beg or spend the night in a public toilet, that’s not a lifestyle choice or anti-social behaviour – that’s extreme poverty.” And it certainly shouldn’t lead to a criminal record.

Under my leadership, the Labour Party will campaign to severely restrict the use of Public Space Protection Orders against the homeless. Local councils will no longer have the ability to target, stigmatise and criminalise rough sleeping. Instead they will have to work with government, charities, businesses and civil society to reduce homelessness and help rough sleepers. That is what responsible government at a local level does.  

This, ladies and gentleman, will make lives a little easier for the thousands of rough sleepers. It will prevent the persecution and criminalisation of those who are the very worse off in society. But, let’s be honest, will not get them immediately off in the streets and into the security of a home. The hundreds of thousands living in temporary accommodation, sofa-surfing or sleeping in cars and offices need more too. So we have to go further along three core lines: reform of the welfare state, an overhaul of the rental market, and encouraging local councils to do the right thing on social housing.

When a number of reports are placing the blame for the dramatic and unacceptable increase in homelessness with welfare reforms introduced by the Coalition Government, it is impossible not to have a comprehensive strategy without positive welfare reform to deal with these issues. There is no chance we shall see it under this Conservative Government who are content to tighten up the benefits cap, despite warnings from your organisation that this risks driving up homelessness across the country. We have to exempt housing benefit from the cap, and reform have it is used, if we are, as a nation, going to get to grips with the housing crisis and rising tide of homelessness.

But we must go further because in the 21st Century, decades after the slums of Britain were swept away, we have no basic rules – applied fairly and consistently across the country – requiring private landlords to provide properties that meet the very low barrier of being fit for human habitation. Local authorities can force landlords to deal with serious health and safety hazards that pose a risk to safety. But this is simply not working for tenants. Shelter’s research has shown clearly that: a third of homes fail to meet the Decent Homes Standard and 60% have experienced problems in the past 12 months including damp, mould, leaks and animal infestations. While there are some good landlords, the private rented sector is a national scandal and an embarrassment. It is defined by rogue, amateur and accidental landlords. And because an increasing number of vulnerable groups, including families, are relying on these landlords for long-term housing solutions, they are posing a risk to the safety and security of millions. So change must come.

Evidence has shown that renters fear retaliatory eviction for reporting poor conditions. One in eight renters have not asked for repairs to be carried out or challenged a rent increase because they fear eviction. Imagine being a young family, unable to afford much more in rent but living in damp accommodation that is harming their children’s health, you are in the unpalatable situation of choosing between two evils: risk eviction by asking for repairs or don’t complain and keep the roof over your head. Which would you pick? I'm not sure myself. Yet the current system, however, relies on complaints from renters without giving them the ability to protect themselves from eviction.

Providing civil redress, as the next Labour Government will, does not mean renters will use it to compel improvements. The risk of eviction remains. So we have to reform the regulations on renting to ban revenge evictions. If a renter reports poor conditions to their landlord and are subsequently served with a ‘Section 21 Notice’, then that Notice will not be valid then or for 6 months if the complaints are genuine. Any renter who starts civil proceedings under this Act will not be subject to such a Notice for its duration, for the time until the works are done, and for 6 months after that. This will give thousands safety, security and certainty. Rogue landlords will not be able to get away with it.

But we must fundamentally restructure the rental market. Currently the market is one of the most liberalised in the world – far more liberalised and exploitative than the labour market in Britain is. Whereas workers have rights from exploitation by employers, tenants lack them. It is time we change that and have a fairer, stronger rental market that works for both tenants and landlords.

I have already set out one restriction of Section 21 Notices that will protect tenants from unfair evictions. We should go further in changing how these notices work. Landlords using these notices can evict tenants on two months’ notice. Imagine rearranging your entire life, sorting alternative accommodation, and dealing with all the issues required in just two months. Of course, it is far worse for the poorest in our society. When millions of people lack any amount of savings, two months is simply not enough to save up for the deposit needed for the next rental. Therefore we will say that no landlord can evict a tenant without giving six months’ notice.

But there are also times in a family’s life when eviction would have a dangerous and detrimental impact. An example of this is when a family is expecting or has a young child. Mothers experience high parental stress, maternal hardship, and depression. This is believed to have a long-term impact, continuing years after the initial eviction. There is also a deleterious impact on the cognitive development of the child which will persist long after the event. No child should be made homeless by a landlord’s eviction. So we will ensure that a Section 21 notice cannot be provided while a mother is pregnant or up to 12 months after the birth of a child.

I must stress that both these reforms do not prevent landlords from evicting tenants with a ‘just cause’ usually based around the non-payment of rent, anti-social behaviour and break-clauses in contracts previously agreed. But this is a fair balance between the rights of tenants and the rights of landlords, one that strengthens the contract between them both and provides additional certainty and security.

The vast majority of tenants would, however, continue to live under a cloud of uncertainty due to the ludicrous short-term nature of most rental contracts. The majority of the 11 million people rent privately do so through contracts that last just 6 or 12 months. Imagine having to move every 6 to 12 months on the whim of private landlords. It is impossible to put roots down in a community, keep in touch with friends, contribute to society, keep a stable job, and save towards a deposit when you have to move and rearrange your life so often.

These short term tenancies offer landlords plenty of opportunities to hold tenants over a barrel and exploit them. But while they don’t work for tenants, they don’t really work for landlords either. The possibility of trying to find new tenants every 6 to 12 months is a big risk and prevents a long-term, stable income for landlords. Therefore, the Government should provide for three year minimum tenancies, perhaps with a break clause at 18 months. This will provide security to tenants and stability to landlords. It is common sense reform of a market that is dysfunctional.

Ladies and gentleman,

There is no doubt that I have covered a lot of ground tonight. But when it comes to housing, there is a lot that needs to be done. I do not doubt that some of the rhetoric used in this speech will offend some. But when so many are homeless or so close to being so, kind words will not help. The callousness and cruelty of many in our society against the homeless is unacceptable. It has to change.  We have rental and ownership markets that no longer work. We have astonishingly high homelessness and increasing rough sleepers. We have the exploitation, discrimination, criminalisation of far too many law-abiding, hard-working, doing-the-right-thing people who are struggling to afford the basics. That all has to change – and under Labour it will.

Thank you
Amelia Lockhart
MP for Hull East (2010 - )

Leader of the Labour Party (2016 - )
Shadow Secretary of State for Women and Equalities (2016 - )
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Amelia Lockhart's campaign sent this letter to every Labour Party member, and voter in the forthcoming contest [1 hour].

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Link: https://i.imgur.com/N1F5WRy.jpg
Amelia Lockhart
MP for Hull East (2010 - )

Leader of the Labour Party (2016 - )
Shadow Secretary of State for Women and Equalities (2016 - )
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Canvass [1hr]

Labour MP James Allen spoke to Labour Supporters in Leeds in support of Amelia Lockhart:

To a voter - Amelia Lockart has the right ideas to fix our NHS. Under Amelia Labour will lower the cap on the use of hospital beds and theatre time by private patients which currently allow such patients to ‘queue jump’ ahead of ordinary taxpayers. Everyone should be able to get the best care on the NHS, regardless if you are private or seeking treatment on the NHS, under the tories it isnt happening , under a Labour Government it can and will happen.


To a second voter: "There is a scandal of declining standards for NHS patients while NHS trusts allow paying patients to enjoy high standards of care. It is against the foundational values of the NHS. The fact is people deserve better under our NHS, which is why under Amelia Lockhart the next Labour Government will guarantee that GP appointments are held within 48 hours and cancer tests are within a week. Labour will deliver a world class healthcare system, under Amelia Lockhart, everyone can benefit from a better NHS"

To a third - With a social care sector in crisis, the quality of care is going down resulting in  pressures on unpaid carers of family and friends, and delays to discharging patients from hospitals. We will therefore address the funding crisis in social care and support the implementation of the principles of the Ethical Care Charter, already adopted in 28 council areas, ending 15-minute care visits and providing care workers with paid travel time, access to training and an option to choose regular hours. There's only one choice with Labour, Amelia Lockhart, for a better NHS for all.
James Allen MP
Shadow Foreign Secretary

MP for Leeds Central

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Amelia Lockhart, MP for Hull East, gave a speech to the Centre for Labour and Social Studies think tank about changing the direction of Labour's economic policy.

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Ladies and gentleman, 

I want to thank the Centre for Labour and Social Studies (CLASS) for hosting my campaign today. You may be a young think tank, established just four years ago, but your influence and impact is larger than many more established organisations. Rooted in the labour movement, you have brought a sharp focus on the alternative economic policies required to build a fairer economy and, more importantly, a fairer society. 

Only the most ideological believe that the current economic strategy is working. Only the most incompetent believe that the current economic strategy will deliver prosperity for all. There is nothing more dangerous than ideologically-motivated incompetence but since 2010, that is all we have seen from the Government. Rising inequality, rising insecurity, and rising deprivation are a direct consequence of the economic strategy pursued by this Government. It is, as the Leader of the House let slip, an ‘experiment’ in which millions have and will continue to lose out.   

And now the Conservative Party is about to tear itself apart over the European Union. Let me be clear: if we vote to leave the European Union, the level of austerity required as businesses collapse, unemployment increases, and tax receipts fall will make the past five years look like a walk in the park. No responsible Government, no responsible Opposition, and no responsible Leader of the Opposition can advocate leaving the European Union or provide anything less than full support for the European Union. If you are anti-austerity as I am, you can only support full membership of the European Union. 

But I also want to be clear: membership of the European Union is not a panacea for our economic problems, just in the same way that leaving the European Union is not a panacea. Blaming the EU for our problems, or expecting it to solve them, is not the answer. We can do so much more to tackle the productivity crisis, reduce inequality, and tackle low pay at Westminster. The reason why we don’t – and why many in Government are content to blame the European Union – is that for too long the Treasury has been a bastion of small-c conservatism, even when led by truly radical Ministers such as Gordon Brown.

When you spend your life entombed in the heart of Whitehall, far away from the suffering crowds in towns and cities across this country, you may assume that the economy has recovered since the Financial Crisis. And you may assume that this country works best when society exists for, and is only useful when it serves, the economy and big business. It isn’t just Conservative Party ministers who believe this. Too many Civil Servants at the heart of policy-making remain out of touch, wedded to old orthodoxies that have failed ordinary people. Under my leadership, I will put the Treasury on notice: it is time for change, radical, wholesale change. After decades of the assumption that society serves our economy and big business, we will reverse it. 

In recent days, we have seen the consequences of a small-c conservatism that Labour must campaign against. It has allowed tax avoiders to run riot across the world. The recent revelations have shown how the richest have treated ordinary people with contempt. This shows the bankruptcy on an ideology, however implicitly, that enables tax avoidance and was personified in the recently-departed Prime Minister, We must use these revelations, and the outrage they have generated, to reset the rules of the global economy. Britain can lead the way in doing this: first, by tackling our contribution to tax avoidance through the City of London. Second, by using our clout with major tax havens in Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories to stop them soliciting avoidance. Third, by leading efforts at the EU and G20 to push for continental action against tax avoiders and havens. This fiscal fraud against the taxpayers of the UK must end – under Labour it will.    

The next Labour Government must ensure implement a watershed in economic policy, setting out clearly that the economy works for society, not the other way around. We will place ethics, community, and equality at the heart of economic policy. And we will not tolerate any attempt by the establishment to frustrate our mandate if we enter Government. We will call time on Governments using our citizens in their ‘experiments’ that cut incomes by hundreds of pounds for 13 million families. 

For what matters for this nation, what defines our success, is not the size of our economy, but how fairly the prosperity is spread; not the size of the state, but how the state helps us all achieve. Until now the Treasury has put GDP first at all costs, but we will put people first at all costs. National renewal must begin with work, family and the places people live. That is why I have spent the past few days speaking out against the Tory welfare plan, because it hurts families the most. 

If we believe that the forces of globalisation and the power of multinational corporations are so great that countries must band together – say in a European Union – to set the rules, increase our sovereignty, and effect change, then we should also support the capacity of workers to do the same. Workers should be supported to work together to set the rules of work, increase individual sovereignty in society, and effect change towards a better economy. That is what my Government will do, with updated trade union laws. 

We cannot continue with a set of trade unions laws written 30 years ago. Our economy has changed fundamentally and detrimentally, in ways that the House of Commons could not predict. The rise of the service sector economy, insecure and ill-paid work, and increasing concentration of ownership has shifted the balance of power between the employer and the employee. And the Coalition Government, followed by this Conservative one, has shifted the balance against the employee even further: employment tribunal fees, the Trade Union Act 2016, and cuts to legal aid are all parts of an all-out assault on British workers.  

If we do not give workers the capacity to stand up for their rights, employers suffer just as much as employees. Allowing exploitative business practices to go unpunished allows the bad to undercut the good, the worst to prosper while the best go to the wall. Resetting the employee-employer relationship is not anti-business, it is anti-bad business. We cannot succeed in this increasingly globalised world if one side can exploit the other, or if one side is prohibited from enjoying the gains of change by the desire of the other to maximise its lot.

Labour Governments have always offered radicalism when it comes to lifting the condition of workers, while also supporting businesses to succeed. The last Labour Government went the furthest of them all by introducing the National Minimum Wage. But we have to accept that the National Minimum Wage and the new so-called National Living Wage have their faults. 

For too long, we have been prepared to tolerate statutory minimum wages that are different for adults of different ages. These arbitrary and discriminatory distinctions must be eliminated by the next Labour Government. The cost of living is not cheaper if you are under 25, therefore your pay should not be lower. And no worker under 25 works any less hard or less effectively at the same job. It really is as simple as that.

Within five years of a Labour Government, elected in 2020 – if the Fixed Term Parliament Act holds that will be by 2025 – there will be one million fewer people in low pay. That is the target I am setting today. To reach that challenging and ambitious target, the Low Pay Commission cannot stay as it is; reform, 15 years after its creation, is long overdue. 

We will broaden the remit of the Low Pay Commission to not only set the Minimum Wage, but be a watchdog on low pay more generally. The Commission should advise the government on how to lift wages in certain sectors, for example, by more adequately funding social care. I also want to give the Commission statutory tools to push for higher wages in certain sectors itself, rather than waiting for Government action. But it is vital that all these reforms retain the evidence-based, sensible approach the Commission adopts for setting the National Minimum Wage. 

This, ladies and gentleman, is how you ensure “the right support and incentives are in place so that people are always better off in work”, as the Government promises, not through cuts to in-work benefits, limits on the support to disabled people, and an arbitrary benefits cap, as the Government delivers. Welfare cuts and immiseration cannot, and never will be, the midwives of a high pay, high labour standards, high growth economy.   

Many economists will tell you that if you want higher pay, there has to be higher productivity. That is true, but also if we want to increase productivity in many sectors, we have to increase both pay and work security. It should not be surprising that workers in lower paid, insecure jobs who don’t know their hours of work, miss out on sick pay, holiday pay and parental rights, and don’t have their voice heard at work are less productive.

If we want to change the way our economy is run, that is more profitable for all, we have to place workers’ voice at its heart. It should not be surprising that workers who feel their voice is heard have stronger morale, are more committed to the place they work, and are more productive. Every business will tell you that its workforce is their most valuable asset. But far too few act as that way. 

Giving workers’ a stronger voice would mean the end of an economy system that brutalises many and fails to recognise their contribution to society. Many people on zero-hour contracts, including care workers, provide crucial services to the most vulnerable members of our society. How we treat those who look after those who need help is a test of our society – and one that we are failing to meet responsibly. 

Tens of thousands of homecare workers are not being paid for their travel time, despite it being against the law. But these workers cannot take their employers to account because of the fees and lack of legal aid. I am determined to change that. We will scrap Employment Tribunal Fees and reverse all cuts to legal aid because justice should be accessed by all, not just the richest. We will reduce the threshold before you can seek unfair dismissal because your rights at work do not depend on your length of service, but because you are a worker. And yes, a Labour Government will reform the use of Zero Hour Contracts. If you want standard and guaranteed hours, you will have a right to them. It is time for us to not only support their collective bargaining, but further extend individual employment rights to those workers.

What I have presented so far is just the start of a more fundamental restructuring of our economy and policy. This is not something I can do alone, however. It will require the entire labour movement to contribute. I am excited about the possibilities, and enthused about the change we can all make for families, communities, and our nation. 

Thank you.
Amelia Lockhart
MP for Hull East (2010 - )

Leader of the Labour Party (2016 - )
Shadow Secretary of State for Women and Equalities (2016 - )
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Speech 1 (2 Hours):

Quote:Friends, thank you for having me here today. The gravest long term threat to our survival, not just as a country, but as a species is the threat of climate change. In order for any of the changes that the Labour will bring while in power to mean anything we must have a planet to live on and unfortunately this is the only one we have within reach which means we have to do what we can now to ensure this planet is livable for generations to come.

Firstly, we must ensure that the industries that we encourage in this country are those that do not actively harm the environment. We have been told for years that there is great potential in this country for a "Green Boom", with our geography favouring renewable energy projects and our educated and skilled workforce we could bring in a new generation of sustainable, green, well paying jobs to regions of the country that have often fallen by the wayside. Regions like the East of England, the South West and Wales that have often found themselves passed over for investment have great potential in terms of renewable energy projects. Green manufacturing techniques have rapidly become more cost-effect and viable due to public interest in environmental sustainability, what has often prevented these industries from spreading is a lack of access to funds. That is why alongside our National Investment Bank, Labour under my leadership will also create and empower a new Green Investment Bank with a mandate to target investment where it is most needed in the country. This means that former industrial areas will have a new generation of fulfilling, well paying jobs that will reinvigorate those communities. It means that more and more of our energy will come from sustainable, low or zero carbon sources, reducing any additional impact of climate change upon future generations.

As a party and as a society, we have to come to terms with the fact that in terms of most key thresholds on climate change, we are too far gone. The amount of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases already in our atmosphere will bring radical changes to the climate. This means that in order to ensure the security of not just the next generation or the generation after that, but many generations to come we must begin to plan for those changes and how we will adapt our lifestyles and countermeasures around them. That is why, in order to prevent higher costs in the future when these changes will have to be made to save lives, Labour under my leadership will create a Climate Change Adaptation Fund to provide money to local councils to begin work on countermeasures to the expected impact from Climate Change. You can see several examples of this beginning to take hold, whether it's Chicago's permeable pavements and rain water storage to prevent flooding, or investment in improving flood defenses and sea walls. For the security of UK citizens in the future, the government must take the lead and provide funds for these projects across the country.

While it may seem that the worst of Climate Change is inevitable, there are further ways that we can tackle Climate Change beyond adaptation. Investment into research areas carbon sinks, that will reduce the net emissions of this country such as carbon capture will play a key part in creating new and innovative ways to reduce our net emissions. Establishing this research now and enacting it as soon as possible will be a key component of any long term plan to gradually reduce the total amount of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere and while the benefits will take a long time and will require consistent commitment and investment into research and implementation I believe that by encouraging this work we can begin to not only mitigate the degradation of our environment, but slowly begin to improve it. Other research areas that should be made a priority and will be under a Labour government led by me will be geoengineering projects that can locally and eventually globally begin to correct the damage we have done.

Even with all of this, it is important to remember and acknowledge that the UK is not alone on this planet, we must work closely with other countries in order to ensure that the work that we put in is not wasted. The Paris Treaty is a nice statement of intent, however even though it is an improvement on unregulated carbon emission, it will likely mean a 3 degrees increase in global temperatures. That will be a disaster for the world, it would see fresh water sources for hundreds of millions of people gone, triggering a refugee crisis on a scale as yet unseen on this planet. That is why Nicaragua has chosen to not join the treaty, because it simply does not go far enough and does not acknowledge the historical causes of the carbon emissions that have led to this climate crisis. That is why as leader of the Labour Party and as Prime Minister I would advocate for a new treaty on climate that goes further than the Paris Agreement, with binding emissions targets and consequences for those countries who consistently fail to meet those targets. Within any such treaty there must also be a binding commitment to reforestation in order to reduce net emissions and an obligation for wealthier countries to assist developing ones in low carbon economic development. While pursuing this global strategy will not be easy, it is now the time, more than ever that we stop saying the easy things about Climate Change and set about doing the hard things internationally.

Friends, the challenges that face us in terms of Climate Change are not easy, if they were we wouldn't be here needing to work through solutions. However, if we face this problem head on, listen to what scientists tell us and take action both domestically and internationally, the UK can be part of the solution and ensure that future generations will have a planet that they can live on peacefully. Thank you.

Speech 2 (2 Hours):

Quote:Thank you all for being here for my final speech of this campaign. It's been an excellent experience travelling and speaking with you all about what I feel Labour needs to do and present to the British electorate in order to win. The challenges facing this country are diverse and complex, but under my leadership, the Labour party can be equipped to face these challenges and make the lives of all people in Britain better. Together we can as a movement, pushing towards a common objective of a fairer, more equal and prosperous society we can bring about a new dawn for Britain.

The first part of our agenda must be to bring about an end to the austerity that has damaged and ruined the lives of many people in this country. Austerity has meant that people have been pushed to the brink and have had to resort to food bank use. It has meant that the NHS is falling further into decline, with winter waiting times soaring, doctors and nurses pushed to the brink. It has meant that the most vulnerable in our society have been routinely abused by both the press in this country and under the command of the Tory government. Just recently we've seen the Tory party show its true face, when an MP advocated for those at the benefit cap to have their benefits reduced by 5% each year they remain at the cap. This is not a joke, this is peoples lives that we're talking about. That's why under my leadership and future term as prime minister, not only will the culture and language of austerity be over, but the poisonous policies themselves will be reverse, whether it's the bedroom tax or this godforsaken reform bill in parliament now and if they ask how we'll pay for it, we'll say the people who stash their cash in Panama and the companies that have had giveaway after giveaway will pay.

We must also acknowledge that if we are to become a sustainable 21st century economy we must begin to make real investments into our infrastructure and be forward thinking about what infrastructure is. That means we must look at the internet and understand that in many parts of the country that the internet infrastructure is woefully inadequate and that private enterprise has so far been unable -or unwilling- to deliver that service to these parts of the country. That is why we must provide the funds and the resources to councils across the country where high-speed internet access is low or non-existent and empower them to bring this essential service to every corner of the country. We must also bring about the investment in our roads, railways and transport links to ensure that we reach our potential as a country. We must also focus this investment in long neglected parts of the country, particularly the North of England. By providing this investment to all of the country as needed we will have a stronger, healthier, more equal and better balanced economy that will be able to generate sustainable growth for year.

This vision for a fairer Britain would not be complete without addressing what our role in the wider world must be. I've made no secret of the fact that I am eurosceptic, the simple fact is that the EU and our membership of it is a complicated and often divisive subject that brings about passion on all sides. Understanding this I want to extend this promise now, no matter the result of the referendum, Leave or Remain, the Labour Party will respect it and will make the best possible judgement on behalf of all of the country, however they may choose to vote. No matter what happens this party will remain an internationalist party that believes in bringing about peace as quickly as possible, with as few casualties to all sides as possible and that will not change under my leadership. However, internationalism does not mean dodgy dossiers, it does not mean regime change for the sake of regime change and it does not mean pretending that the situation on the ground of any conflict in the world is different from the reality. There is room for humanitarian intervention, peacekeeping, the provision of logistical support to allies and the denying of logistics to hostile entities in my vision for this countries role in the world. There is also room for, when it is possible facilitating peaceful conflict resolution with those who are willing to engage in it. This does not mean that we tolerate genocidal regimes, but this means that we take an alternative path and role in how we bring about the end of those abusive and illegitimate regimes.

Friends this has been an interesting campaign where I hope I have brought forward the best of what the Labour party has to offer under my leadership not just to you here today, but members and voters across the country. When Jeremy Corbyn was elected as leader, it shocked many people, it didn't shock me. This country and members of this party and people across the broad left in this country wanted an anti-austerity, pro-peace and environmentally friendly party. By voting for me you will be voting to bring about this vision not only to the Labour party, but to the country as a whole. Thank you.

Canvassing (1 Hour):

Quote:Alex Uyanik spoke with members after his final speech of the campaign. He touched on the issues of Climate Change, austerity and Trade Union Rights.

To one member he said:
"The simple fact is that we have to get a grip on the Climate Change issue. For too long we've been of the mindset that we will suddenly come up with a miracle solution. Of course we should provide the resources for research, but there are many things we can do now both domestically and internationally. Chief among which is that the Labour party in government will push for a stronger and more binding international treaty that will seek to create a global strategy for tackling climate change and bring consequences for violating that strategy."

To another member he said:
"At a basic level, the Tories inhumanity is repeatedly rearing its head through their austerity regime. There have been countless people tipped over the edge into destitution and in a country as rich as our own that can't be considered right. That's why under my leadership the austerity cuts will be reverse and the political shift that began with Jeremy will continue with me and we will continue to push a strong, clear, anti-austerity message to deliver a Labour government that will benefit the whole country."

To a third member he said:
"Our trade union laws are among the most repressive in Europe, is it any wonder that workers are getting sick of the short end of the stick? Labour under my leadership will pledge to reverse anti union legislation and give organised workers the right to properly fight for their interests, instead of being told what they're going to be given and forced to accept it. When workers are empowered, their conditions improve, their pay improves and ultimately we all benefit as a society."

Poster (1 Hour):


[Image: Dh7kLQf.jpg?1]
Dr Alex Uyanik | MP for Walthamstow (1979-1987, 1992-Present) | Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Transport and the Regions (2016-)

"An Anti-Democratic decision cannot be made with votes" - Erdal Inonu
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Poster (1hr);

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MP for Bristol West

#ANARCHISE THE NATION

(In previous lives: violated a confidence and supply agreement, tried to fight a man on Eton's nine-hole golf course, released a leaflet torpedoing ones own party and was likened to an M&M shovelling money into a fireplace)
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Labour leadership election results

Amelia Lockhart: 275,718 (54.4%)
Alex Uyanik: 230,720 (45.6%)
Andy
Advisor for the Labour Party, the Home Office and the Department for Environment, Communities, and the Regions
Poll wrangler and election psephologist
Scandalmonger

I forget Andy has political opinions. I always just think of him as a Civil Servant in real life - Mac
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