Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
BBC News
#1
BBC News
Dan

Head Administrator (For all game matters)

PoliticsUK

"Si vis pacem, para bellum" 
Reply
Thanks given by:
#2
Paddy Ashdown falls off ferry, Hattingly elected Liberal Democrats leader

Leader of the Liberal Democrats Paddy Ashdown passed away today after slipping and falling off a ferry traveling between East Cowes and Southampton. The late Mr Ashdown, facing rough seas in the Solent, faced delays in being removed from the water. Attempts to resuscitate him were unsuccessful.

President of the Liberal Democrats Charles Kennedy spoke to the press following the confirmation of Mr Ashdown's death, saying that "Paddy Ashdown led the way for the evolution of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party from an electoral alliance into the Liberal Democrats of today. He was a true visionary and transformative leader that led our party to electoral success. He will be missed by all."

Following the death of Mr Ashdown, Mr Kennedy convened the Liberal Democrat MPs and members of Federal Board of the Liberal Democrats to call for emergency nominations for the party leadership. At the meeting, MPs nominated current Liberal Democrat Treasury spokesman Oscar Hattingly to serve as Leader of the Liberal Democrats, the only MP to receive nominations. His nomination was unanimously approved by the Federal Board without the need for a leadership election amongst party members.

Mr Kennedy, announcing the new leadership, said that, "Oscar Hattingly has led the way in devising truly liberal policies that would ensure economic prosperity and opportunity in the United Kingdom. I, along with the rest of the Federal Board, are convinced that Mr Hattingly will continue Paddy's record to success in leading the Liberal Democrats."
Reply
Thanks given by:
#3
Betty Boothroyd elected Commons Speaker

[Image: _984018_betty.300.jpg]

Following the decision of Bernard Weatherill to stand down as Speaker of the House of Commons at the last election, Betty Boothroyd was elected as his successor. In an election presided over by Father of the House and former Prime Minister Ted Heath, she defeated Conservative MP Peter Brooke by a vote of 372-238 to be elected the first woman Speaker of the House.

"I am deeply honoured by the trust placed in me by my colleagues," said Ms Boothroyd following her election. "I only pray that I will be able to fulfill the duties of this office as admirably as my predecessors.

Ms Boothroyd was nominated by Conservative MP and former Cabinet minister John Biffen and seconded by Labour MP Gwyneth Dunwoody. Mr Brooke was nominated by Sir Michael Neubert and Sir Tom Arnold, both Conservative MPs.

In her final statement to the House before becoming Speaker, Ms Boothroyd stated that she hopes that she "can use [her] voice strongly in fairness and justice when the occasion demands" and will "discharge [her] duty to protect minority rights without ignoring the fact that majorities have rights as well". She proceeded to offer herself "as the voice of the House —sensitive to the concerns of every Member, aware of the supreme duty of the Speaker to safeguard the rights of this House, abandoning all [her] previous commitments to party, and content to serve the House for as long as it may require."
Reply
Thanks given by: Richard De Villiers (CON)
#4
Sir Dylan Macmillan resigns as Conservative Leader


Sir Dylan Macmillan has resigned as Conservative Party Leader.

Sir Dylan, who was elected Conservative leader following the resignation of John Major, had recently come under pressure following the Conservative Party's slip in the polls which was attributed to the lack of response to the Government's Queen's Speech in parliament and the absence of a speech at Chatham House on Maastricht. Conservative Grandees had recently had reportedly told the Telegraph that changes needed to be made and there needed to be a credible opposition. 

The BBC understands from a Conservative Source the 1922 Committee had expressed concern to the now former Conservative Leader at the slip in the polls and demanded results, it is understood Sir Dylan then informed the 1922 Committee of his intention to resign in the meeting. 

The Conservatives will now elect a new leader, it is understood former Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd is considering a leadership bid whereas Norman Lamont has ruled out a leadership bid.
Dan

Head Administrator (For all game matters)

PoliticsUK

"Si vis pacem, para bellum" 
Reply
Thanks given by:
#5
Controversial book on Princess Diana published


[Image: princess-diana-with-her-private-secretar...mwidth=450]



A controversial new book about the Princess of Wales claims she has attempted suicide on several occasions over the last decade, and portrays her as a deeply depressed and unstable character.

The book alleges that Princess Diana tried to kill herself on as many as five occasions during the 1980s.

Author Andrew Morton insists he has reliable sources for the allegations, which appear in Diana: Her True Story.

Buckingham Palace has refused to comment on any specific claims, and said Princess Diana did not co-operate with the biography in any way whatsoever.

The Princess has begun another full week of engagements, attending the annual Order of the Garter service with other members of the royal family at Windsor on the eve of the book's publication. Although she appeared composed at this event, she was seen breaking down in tears at another public engagement in Liverpool last week

Speaking for the first time since details of the book became known, Mr Morton said: "The tears that she has shed in public in Liverpool are nothing compared to the tears she has shed over the last year. I can't emphasise strongly enough the volatility of the situation inside Kensington Palace".

Mr Morton rejected suggestions that the revelations were based on rumour and gossip, and said he had interviewed a number of sources close to the princess who had insisted on anonymity.

Mr Morton went on to say: "It is not hearsay. It is what the Princess of Wales has told her friends about what happened to her in 1982, in the early 80s, and the last suicide attempt I think was in 1986. My job is as a biographer, not as someone who is organising or orchestrating the future of the royal family."
Dan

Head Administrator (For all game matters)

PoliticsUK

"Si vis pacem, para bellum" 
Reply
Thanks given by:
#6
Huge rise in number of water disconnections

[Image: watertap_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqCKQT0PXyAw9lN...mwidth=450]


The number of people having their water supplies cut off for failing to pay their bills has almost trebled in a year, new figures show.

The water industry was privatised in 1989 under Margaret Thatcher and the Conservative Government. The dramatic rise saw more than 20,000 homes disconnected - an increase of 177% on the previous financial year, according to industry watchdog Ofwat. Water companies have now been warned they must take into account their customers' ability to pay before cutting off supplies.

South Staffordshire Water had the highest proportion of disconnections in the country, with seven times the national average. The company defended itself, saying it had detailed rules to deal with non-payers. Tony Woodward, from South Staffordshire Water, said there was a five month time period from the initial billing to disconnections. 

"During that period we attempt to contact the customer at least seven times, even including a personal visit," he said.

Four of the largest water companies have just announced annual profits ranging from £90m at South West Water to £236m at Thames Water.

The companies insist they are reinvesting a large part of their profits into improving supplies and preventing pollution, and say water bills have risen for the same reason.

But Ofwat said the companies' monopoly of water supplies carried a responsibility to do everything possible to help those who struggled to pay their bills.

Ofwat Director-General Ian Byatt also stressed that those customers who were paying their bills should not be penalised through price increases to cover those failing to pay.

He has called on water companies to "deal sympathetically and effectively with those who have difficulty in paying."
Dan

Head Administrator (For all game matters)

PoliticsUK

"Si vis pacem, para bellum" 
Reply
Thanks given by:
#7
Thatcher takes her place in the House of Lords


[Image: 200px-Margaret_Thatcher.jpg]



Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher has taken her place in the House of Lords as Baroness Thatcher of Kesteven. She is expected to take part in her first debate in two days time. 

Although the quieter, more reflective House of Lords is not regarded as the natural battleground of the aggressive former prime minister, her Conservative Party allies hope she will use the Lords to keep her policies on the agenda.

During her acceptance ceremony she said: "I, Margaret Baroness Thatcher, so swear by almighty God that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, her heirs and successors according to law, so help me God."

She announced her decision to leave the Commons seven months after being ousted from Number 10 by her own party.

At the time the former prime minister indicated she wanted to remain in politics. She said her decision to leave the Commons would give her more freedom to speak her mind, and made it clear she would fight any proposal for European integration that would threaten British sovereignty.

Baroness Thatcher of Kesteven was asked to comment on the Conservative leadership contest by the BBC earlier that is taking place following the resignation of Sir Dylan Macmillan earlier today. The former Prime Minister said "It's a shame to see the party choose another leader so soon, however I am sure the party will move forward under a new leader and one day return to Government." When asked her thoughts on the candidates who have already declared, the former Prime Minister refused to comment.
Dan

Head Administrator (For all game matters)

PoliticsUK

"Si vis pacem, para bellum" 
Reply
Thanks given by:
#8
Church of England votes for Women Priests



Women fighting for the right to be anglican priests are celebrating a narrow victory.

 After a five-and-a-half hour debate the General Synod - the Church of England's parliament - passed the controversial legislation by a margin of only two votes.

There were jubilant scenes among supporters outside Church House in Westminster, London, when the decision was announced.

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr George Carey, who had backed the proposal said he recognised the result would not please everyone.

"What binds us together in God's love as a Church is vastly more important than a disagreement about women's ordination,'' Dr Carey said.

But the Reverend Peter Geldard, who opposed women priests, warned the decision would "pit diocese against diocese, parish against parish and parishioner against parishioner".

The Church of England currently allows women to serve as deacons which means they can perform baptisms, marriages, and burials.


However, they are not allowed to give communion or administer any of the other sacraments.



The issue of whether to ordain women as priests has divided the Church since it was first debated 17 years ago.



Traditionalist priests and bishops have threatened to resign over the issue.



More than 1,000 priests are expected to leave in the next few years and an opposition group, Cost of Conscience, is planning to form breakaway groups.

One high-profile opponent of women priests is former Government minister Ann Widdecombe who recently left the Church of England.



Ms Widdecombe, who accused the Church of ''promoting political correctness above the very clear teachings of Scripture'', said she was considering becoming a Roman Catholic.



About 1,400 women deacons are waiting to be ordained priests.


It is not expected any ordination of women will take place for at least a year as the change will need to be approved by parliament. 
Dan

Head Administrator (For all game matters)

PoliticsUK

"Si vis pacem, para bellum" 
Reply
Thanks given by:
#9
Hillsborough victim allowed to die

Doctors treating Hillsborough victim Tony Bland can disconnect feeding tubes keeping him alive, a judge at the High Court in London has ruled.

The president of the Family Division, Sir Stephen Brown, said there was no "reasonable possibility" that after three years Mr Bland would emerge from a coma known as a "persistent vegetative state" or PVS.

Mr Bland's parents, Allan and Barbara, supported the doctors' court action and said they were "relieved" at the ruling.

Tony Bland, 22, suffered severe brain damage when he and hundreds of other football supporters were crushed in an overcrowded stand at Hillsborough stadium in April 1989.

Ninety-five fans died in the disaster.

In the High Court Mr Bland's doctors at Airedale General Hospital, near Keighley in Yorkshire and other experts in the field said he could survive for up to five years but he would never recover.

If food were withdrawn he would die within days.

Sir Stephen ruled, for the first time in an English court, that artificial feeding through a tube is medical treatment and that to discontinue treatment would be in accordance with good medical practice.

The true cause of Mr Bland's death would be the Hillsborough disaster, Sir Stephen added.

But the lawyer appointed by the Official Solicitor to act on Mr Bland's behalf argued that to withdraw food from him would be tantamount to murder and said he would be appealing against the decision.

Doctors have agreed to continue feeding Mr Bland until after the appeal is heard on 30 November.

A spokesman for an anti-euthanasia group, Keith Davies, also announced its intention to contest the ruling.

Mr Davies from Life said: "We believe this decision is unsafe and unsatisfactory and we will be using every legal, legitimate and democratic means to oppose it."
Dan

Head Administrator (For all game matters)

PoliticsUK

"Si vis pacem, para bellum" 
Reply
Thanks given by:
#10
IRA admits murder of MI5 'informers'

The IRA has admitted killing three men found by the army at different roadsides in South Armagh last night.

They claim the men were informers for MI5. They claim the informers were working with the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) Special Branch and they had been tried and killed by the IRA.

The victims were from Portadown, County Armagh and have been identified as Gregory Burns, 33, John Dignam, 32, and Aidan Starrs, 29.

In a style typical of IRA ritual killings the bodies were found in ditches, naked and hooded with evidence of beatings and single bullets through the backs of the heads.

The IRA tried to justify the murders in an unusually detailed statement, outlining the intelligence work of the three and linking them to the murder of civil servant Margaret Perry, 26.

Her body was found on Tuesday in a shallow grave over the border in Mullaghmore, County Sligo after she disappeared on her way to work in Portadown over a year ago.

The IRA claim that Ms Perry was having an affair with one of the dead men, Mr Burns, but says she had threatened to expose the group's intelligence links to the IRA, so they had kidnapped and murdered her.

All three men disappeared from their homes a few days ago and their bodies were dumped close to the border within 10 miles of each other, at Newtownhamilton, Bessbrook and Crossmaglen.

The army left them overnight in case they had been booby trapped.
Dan

Head Administrator (For all game matters)

PoliticsUK

"Si vis pacem, para bellum" 
Reply
Thanks given by:
#11
LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION TO FACE VOTE OF NO CONFIDENCE


The Chair of the 1992 Committee Cranley Onslow has confirmed that enough letters have been submitted and have passed the threshold for a no confidence vote in Conservative Party Leader Nicholas Wandsworth.

The Conservatives have faced trouble over the past 48 hours with the resignation of Deputy Leader George Mounstuart. The leader of the opposition said in a statement following the resignation that " Certain ideas of his are ones I consider to be unsuited for a party that, while seeking to conserve the best of our past, we also have the need to look forward."

It is not known if the now former deputy leader of the Conservative Party is one of the MPs who have submitted letters to the 1922 Committee calling for a vote of no confidence.

The leader of the opposition will now face a no confidence vote later this week. If Mr Wandsworth wins the vote he will be granted immunity from future challenges for one year. If he loses the vote the Conservatives will be choosing another leader, with Mr Wandsworth barred from standing.
Dan

Head Administrator (For all game matters)

PoliticsUK

"Si vis pacem, para bellum" 
Reply
Thanks given by:
#12
Oscar Hattingly resigns as Lib Dem Leader

The BBC has learned that Oscar Hattingly is to stand down as leader of the Liberal Democrats. In a short statement he said that he had recently been diagnosed with lung cancer and that he would no longer be able to represent the Liberal Democrats to his best ability while undergoing treatment. He also said that he would continue to serve as MP for Truro and that he hoped to return to frontbench politics after successful treatment of his illness.

The Federal Board of the Liberal Democrats met in emergency session and approved the candidacy of Phillip Porter, MP for Orkney and Shetlands, as Leader of the Liberal Democrats. Mr Porter follows his predecessor, Jo Grimmond, as Liberal Leader from the Islands. The new Lib Dem leader faces a changing time in politics, which has seen his party’s fortunes on the ascendancy. Can he continue the upward trajectory?
Reply
Thanks given by:
#13
Should we worry about Northern Ireland?
Editorial by John Sergeant, Chief Political Editor

As rumours fly across Westminister, the eyes of the political world have now turned to the usually-slow-paced brief of Northern Ireland. The peace process itself and the Troubles are a constant source of political intrigue and controversy but today it wasn't the unionist or nationalist parties who were caught-up in the heat but the British Labour Party.

For any Government minister to be investigated for use of Class A drugs would spell difficulty for any administration but for it to be the Northern Ireland Secretary during a time of real intensity for Northern Ireland is more serious still.

Unionist leaders meet tonight to discuss the matter. Their lips were sealed tightly shut on the way in but the socially conservative DUP, a long-outspoken advocate for tougher drugs legislation, did say this;

"It is vital for the potential for peace in Northern Ireland that all involved retain the confidence of each other. The Northern Ireland Secretary is no exception."

Some Labour members and MPs, and indeed Ministers, may well feel UK drug law needs to modernise and that demonising a man for a past crime is backwards however there are still millions of people around the UK who want tougher drugs laws including many within the Labour Party. How the Government handle this revelation will really determine whether we should worry about Northern Ireland.
Aaron | Coaching Admin
Civil Service roles: FCO, MoD, Environment
Press roles: Foreign coverage
Reply
Thanks given by:
#14
Devolution Referendums approach – which way will you vote?

Wales and Scotland are poised to get campaigning underway in the upcoming with both campaigns beginning to take shape. The referendums come as a result of the Labour Government committing to hold these votes on the future of politics in Wales and Scotland in their manifesto. The legislation was supported by a wide array of parties, including the Liberal Democrats, Plaid Cymru and the Scottish National Party. It was, and continues, to be opposed by the Conservative Party who are expected to take prominent roles in the No campaign in both nations.

These two referendums are not the first Scottish and Welsh voters have been asked if they want devolution. In 1979, similar questions were put to the people and delivered very different results, with Scotland voting in favour but missing the turnout threshold and Wales wholeheartedly voting against. Will these referendums prove different?

Devolution has been touted by it’s proponents, such as George Robertson MP, as a potential solution to nationalistic sentiments from Plaid Cymru and the Scottish National Party, that by providing power to the nations it will quell those loud voices. If the votes go in the Government’s favour time will only tell. There has been vociferous opposition to the referendums from the Conservatives, who claim the devolution will only divide the country.

Both sides of the argument are gearing up for a fight and if we look at the politics of the matter the upcoming referendums looks like the fight might get very heated. Government Ministers and supporting Oppositions MPs have come out in favour of the result, most notably the embattles Constitutional Affairs Secretary, Moray Mac Ghil Fhaolain and the Prime Minister, Agnes Hamstead who said she was “proud to lead a government that is returning power to where it belongs: closer to the people most impacted by government decision making”. On the other side, Conservative MP for Woking Philipa Mountjoy has been pressing Ministers for greater detail on their plans for action after the referendum.

With both sides set to be hotly contested all will be to play for.
Reply
Thanks given by:


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)