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General Press Cycle
Our first major piece of education legislation not only looks like it will be passed comfortably but with the support of even the Conservatives. Thanks to this first step, we will improve opportunity for every child in our schools. It will see teachers supported to provide the highest possible standard of learning for every child, it will give us the tools to prevent excessively large class sizes from continuing and it will see resources put to work where they will benefit all of our children by ending the Tory assisted places scheme and by ending selection at age 11 and the failed grammar school experiment. This is only the first piece of legislation this government aims to pass to improve standards of education in this country dramatically and is coupled with our commitment to making a significant investment in education in each budget we pass. This Labour government is successfully implementing the vision to revolutionise education that everyone can get behind and with our next steps, we will keep this progress going.
Janet Marshall
Secretary of State for Public Services
Labour MP for Nottingham North
Progress
Former Shadow Secretary of State for Social Security (1992)
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It's rather a shame that the Government took what could have been a good bill and ruined it in the name of politics. We absolutely should tackle large class sizes and do the best for our nation's children- but cutting off assisted places is using children as a political pawn. The assisted places scheme has helped tens of thousands of students have access to the absolute best education they could get- and it's not a plan that helps the children of the rich but the children of laborers, of teachers and service workers, of minorities that don't have the means but who have the capacity and drive to excel. Assisted places has been a tool to bring a better education to tens of thousands. To throw that away and close the doors for gifted students throughout the UK is not something that should have been tossed into a reform bill. We should open opportunities, and this Government wants to shut doors rather than open them.
Edward Addie MP
City of London and Westminster South | Conservative Party | Conservative Way Forward

Telegram: @AddieUSG
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I find it funny Tories after coming out in favor of this bill are only now finding the parts they don't like after the debate. Just goes to Show even with new leadership the Conservative party are still an unmitigated Addiesaster.
"the fagnoglin"  Moray Mac Gill Fhaolain MP Aberdeen North 1964-Present

1973-1974 Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
1976-1978 Secretary of State for Transport
1978-1979 Secretary of State for Scotland
1979-1987 Shadow Secretary of State for Workers and Pensions
1992-Present Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Constitutional Affairs & Devolution

fmrly Sean Kapur fmr. Shadow Minister of Environment, Housing, and Ag 
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The next time the Official Opposition decides it opposes something, they should do so during the debate in the House of Commons; not by forgetting which lobby to go through. It speaks volumes to the Addie leadership: screech about a "bad" bill, and they all troop through the Aye lobby with the government anyway. Say nothing critical about a bill, vote for it, get confused, vote against it, and all the while nobody knows where the Tories stand on anything. No wonder the Leader of the Opposition uses five year old polling data, that's the last time the Tories weren't running third.
Rt. Hon. Agnes Hamstead
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1992 - Present)
Labour | Copeland (1987 - Present)
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I disagree profoundly with the Leader of the Opposition's statement about Assisted Places - that money to help tens of thousands is better spent helping millions - but they were points worthy of that debate and discussion in our public forum. So why not raise them? Why rush to the press? Why seemingly u-turn on yet another policy stance? Addie's position on Section 28 is nothing but confusion, his stance on local government funding more flip flopping confusion and now we have this faux pas - the British public deserve clarity from their Opposition. 
Labour
MP for Hartlepool (1983-Present). 
Shadow Minister for Social Security (1987-1990). 
Shadow Chief Whip (1990-1992). 
Home Secretary (1992-Present).

"I hear you really care about Europe. Well, that's alright, as long as you remember I really care about the Labour Party." - James Callaghan.

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When you thought the Tories couldn't become more of a farce, you get their new leader's responses to the government's major education legislation. First, there are no substantive comments from their whole party about the legislation - either in Parliament or in the press. Then, Addie goes ahead and votes for the bill. Suddenly, after I speak to the press about the benefits of the legislation that is about to pass, Addie heads back through the other lobby and cancels his vote out to an abstention. Meanwhile, other members of his frontbench team are voting against the legislation and now suddenly Addie himself is opposing it in the press. Did they not bother to read the legislation or pay any attention before I commented on it? Did they have a sudden change of heart? Did Addie get lost wandering the corridors of Parliament? It's an absolute shambles. The Tories are failing abysmally even as an opposition party. Forget Addie leading them to a better future - he can't even lead himself down the right voting lobby.

Assisted places is a scheme which chooses to place significant public funds behind a tiny minority at the expense of everyone else. Both assisted places and grammar schools are attempts to pick children as winners or losers at the age of eleven - and both let down many times more children than they supposedly assist. This government is firmly committed to giving the most educational opportunity possible to every one of our children and moving resources from selective programmes to ones where they can help everyone is a key part of that strategy. Addie may believe this was "tossed into" our legislation, but only because it appears he didn't bother to read it or pay attention when it was introduced. The maths is simple: Addie's Tories want to help thousands; this Labour government is making huge strides forward in education for millions of children.
Janet Marshall
Secretary of State for Public Services
Labour MP for Nottingham North
Progress
Former Shadow Secretary of State for Social Security (1992)
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The Labour Government have chosen to attack the petty vice of smoking in their most recent round of social engineering. Nobody is foolish enough to think that smoking is healthy, but then we know that other things are unhealthy too. What's next? Ban advertising for beer? Spirits? How about fish and chips? Perhaps next Saturday when you're at the football ground, you'll have to eat a carrot because Mrs. Hamstead won't let you have a pie. Labour's nanny-statism would be funny, were it not so completely alarming.
[Image: VO5PA6L.png]
R I C H A R D • D E • V I L L I E R S
C O N S E R V A T I V E
for
G R A N T H A M

Shadow SoS for Regions, Nations, & Devolution | Constitutional Affairs

CORNERSTONE GROUP
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Richard De Villiers is, once again, showing how out of touch he is. So out of touch, in fact, that his new leader saw fit to remove him from shadowing my government department. There is no attacking going on. There is no forcing any person in this country to do anything. But Richard knows this. He knows that he has to create these fictions because he cannot argue with the facts. The fact is that smoking is an activity which causes devastating damage to health in our society, with no such thing as a safe amount of consumption (unlike some other products he may wish to mention) and addictive impact which is crippling. The fact is that it is clearly wrong to allow companies to glamorise and promote a product with such damaging impacts to our young people. The fact is that nobody is going to be prevented from smoking, but that these advertisements exist only to promote people to take up smoking and to suffer the long-lasting consequences of doing so. It is the job of a government to promote positive health within our nation. Our common-sense steps on tobacco advertising and regulation do not impinge on any person's liberties, but ensure that was is promoted within our society is positive health, not deadly addictions.
Janet Marshall
Secretary of State for Public Services
Labour MP for Nottingham North
Progress
Former Shadow Secretary of State for Social Security (1992)
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I am extremely concerned at the lack of planning by the government should the vote on Devolution go ahead.  Not one Minister has been able to assure me that their Department has any contingency plans in place.

Don't get me wrong.  I am very much for England and Scotland, along with Wales and Northern Ireland, staying united.  I am open to suggestions on how we can keep the union...well...united, but the Bill presented by the Government serves only to dissemble the Union and alienate the constituent members of the UK from one another.
Philippa "Pippa" Mountjoy MP
Conservative MP for Woking (1970 - Present)
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I don't understand what Mountjoy is on about. She asked me if I was prepared for the result of the devolution referenda and I assured her that our government is totally prepared, whatever decision the people of Scotland and Wales make. She even seems confused about what the bill we passed entails and whether there is going to be a referendum. She wonders whether the government is prepared "should the vote on Devolution go ahead" - well the vote on devolution is going ahead. Has she not noticed? Did she not spot people starting to plan campaigns for these referenda? I firmly believe the United Kingdom is best served by devolution - by more Scottish and Welsh decisions being made closer to those who will feel their effects. Whatever we believe, though, our government is prepared for any outcome of the referenda and will always work hard to deliver on the will of the people.
Janet Marshall
Secretary of State for Public Services
Labour MP for Nottingham North
Progress
Former Shadow Secretary of State for Social Security (1992)
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I have great admiration for Janet Marshall. But she is wrong in her statement.  I don't know if it is through lack of experience or a misplaced sense Cabinet loyalty, but no....no...she and her fellow Minister's haven't provided any plans at all.  
Philippa "Pippa" Mountjoy MP
Conservative MP for Woking (1970 - Present)
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I welcome Pippa Mountjoy's enthusiasm for Question Time. Given she's asked me about ten times the questions her current Leader has, I'm sure she'll be bumped up the roster for next week's Conservative leadership race as that's about how often they occur. But for her to say that the government doesn't have a plan for devolution is wrong. But don't take my word for it, let's review what she had to say on the matter:

(10-31-2018, 08:46 PM)Philippa Mountjoy Wrote: ...I applaud the fact that the Government is prepared for whatever the outcome of the referendum should be.  

She ought to make up her mind: is she applauding our plan or isn't there one? I know confusion is the Tory MO - be it on this or on how to vote - but she ought to try being consistent in what she says.
Rt. Hon. Agnes Hamstead
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1992 - Present)
Labour | Copeland (1987 - Present)
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The Bill proposed by the Liberal Democrats on PR is a potential disaster.  Do you want the future governments of the UK to be decided by the Liberal Democrats? This Bill serves no-one other than the Liberal Democrats.  It is a self-serving Bill that they have presented to get them Ministerial cars at any cost.
Philippa "Pippa" Mountjoy MP
Conservative MP for Woking (1970 - Present)
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I am very proud of the Electoral Reform Referendum Act that was just submitted to Parliament. This legislation would ensure free, fair, and proportional voting across Britain. It would ensure that the will of the British people is properly expressed in the number of elected officials sent to Parliament. Others offer false arguments and negative narratives without actually disputing the facts of the case. It's clear that the British people certainly prefer Liberal Democrats solutions over Tory troubles and I think the will of the people should reflect that. 
Philip Porter
MP for Orkney and Shetlands (1983-Present)
Leader of the Liberal Democrats (1992-Present)
Liberal Democrats Spokesman for the Treasury (1992)



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Bless Philip Porter.  So proud of his Bill. At the end of the day, this Bill will bring you Government that you didn't elect.  It will bring you a Government that is comprised of parties that came third, fourth and fifth in the election.
Philippa "Pippa" Mountjoy MP
Conservative MP for Woking (1970 - Present)
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We could discuss the merits of electoral reform until the cows come home - but ultimately the British people overwhelmingly voted for parties that believe the current electoral system is fit for purpose, so a referendum will be a waste of time and money. The British people face unemployment, crime, poverty and weakened public services - the government will focus on resolving these issues while the Liberal Democrats waste their time to talk about their favourite constitutional hobbyhorse. 
Labour
MP for Hartlepool (1983-Present). 
Shadow Minister for Social Security (1987-1990). 
Shadow Chief Whip (1990-1992). 
Home Secretary (1992-Present).

"I hear you really care about Europe. Well, that's alright, as long as you remember I really care about the Labour Party." - James Callaghan.

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Here's the problem with the Liberal Democrats' bill: it's a sham consultation. "Here's our preferred electoral system, we're the third party, what do you think?" is not the kind of referendum that is good public consultation. I'm not opposed to electoral reform; but I would never ram through a preferred system with no public consultation and no discussions with the Electoral Commission. This is why the Liberal Democrats are not taken seriously: half-baked proposals with no thought.
Rt. Hon. Agnes Hamstead
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1992 - Present)
Labour | Copeland (1987 - Present)
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